Treatment

11/30/2017 in Treatment

Guest Blogger:  Dennis Brown, MD

On July 2, 2017, the prestigious “Journal of American Medical Association” (JAMA) published an authoritative medical study regarding radiofrequency denervation (ablation) procedures for chronic low back pain titled "Effect of Radiofrequency Denervation on Pain Intensity Among Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain," which concluded "The findings do not support the use of radiofrequency denervation to treat chronic low back pain from these sources" (facet joints, sacroiliac joints or a combination of facet joints, sacroiliac joints, or intervertebral disks).
 
It is medically probable radiofrequency denervation is not medically reasonable or necessary for the treatment of chronic low back pain.

Reference:  Johan N. S. Juch, MD; Esther T. Maas, PhD; Raymond W. J. G. Ostelo, PT, PhD, et l Effect of Radiofrequency Denervation on Pain Intensity Among Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain The Mint Randomized Clinical Trials, JAMA. 2017;318(1): 68-91.doi:10.1001/jama.2017.7918

Low back problems are a necessary evil of being human due to our anatomy and physiology.  This is of great importance in many medicolegal claims in which an injury or repetitive stress exposure is alleged to have caused low back problems, thereby attempting to shift responsibility for the costs imposed by low back problems from the individual and his or her health insurance (if applicable) to the liability policyholder/employer and the liability/workers compensation insurance carrier.  The high prevalence of low back problems in the general population makes differentiating between idiopathic problems and those caused by an accident or repetitive stress exposure extremely difficult.  It is also complicated by the fact that the idea of a manifestation of a preexisting condition is at odds with our folk understanding of temporal proximity and causality, i.e. if two things happen near in time, we tend to assume they are causally related, with the first thing causing the second thing.

Human beings perform many cognitive tasks exceptionally well.  Accurately assigning causation is not one of them.  In particular, we are prone to making a priori assumptions about how things work and then confirming our assumptions (confirmation bias) post hoc (post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy).  Low back pain is a notable example:  we often associate low back pain with lumbar disc pathology discovered on post-injury MRI despite the fact that we know from the medical literature large percentages of the general population have similar MRI findings but no low back pain.  We make the assumption based on our assessment of human anatomy and physiology that lumbar discs work in a certain way and when they are compromised it must cause discernible effects such as low back pain.  We then see evidence of compromised lumbar discs in persons who complain of low back pain following an injury or exposure and we leap to the bias-confirming post hoc conclusion that the pathology or compromised condition is causing the pain.  So strong is this impulse that we ascribe causation even though we are well-aware of the medical literature demonstrating that disc pathology is an exceedingly poor proxy for low back pain.  The coup de grace of this faulty reasoning is the post hoc association between disc pathology and pain:  physicians will regularly conclude that a specific event or long term exposure caused a herniated disc despite the person being in a population cohort in which it is at least as likely than not that herniated disc was present before the injury or exposure.  The only reasonable way one could reach this conclusion is with a pre-injury MRI showing there was not a herniated disc.

The problem with this sort of faulty reasoning is that it can lead to treatment that is extraordinarily expensive but ineffective.  In a low back pain claim with post-injury evidence of a herniated disc, the treatment is often a discectomy/laminectomy with or without fusion.  If the herniated disc was not causing the pain, the surgery will have been unnecessary.  While the placebo effect will almost certainly result in some short term improvement, the long term outcomes are likely to be, at best, no different than they would have been with conservative therapy because the treatment will have been aimed at discal pathology that was benign.  The triers of fact in the medicolegal systems will, however, require the workers compensation or liability carriers to absorb the costs of surgery, including non-medical costs that are recoverable under the different systems (such as indemnity payments in worker’s compensation or wage loss and pain and suffering in personal injury), because they are likely to believe the opinion that the herniated disc is the problem.  This belief is based on the folk (mis)understanding of cause and effect.

There is an expression in statistics that has been borrowed by cognitive psychologists:  regression to the mean.  It simply holds that unusual states, events, or findings tend to be temporary and regress over time to the average or status quo.  This is true with many non-malignant medical conditions as well.  This is both profound and somewhat dispiriting because it means that most of these conditions will get better over time regardless of treatment.  It is hence a fallacy to ascribe efficacy to treatment or causation based on recovery following treatment when a condition simply regresses to the mean because it would have regressed to the mean regardless of treatment.

Much attention has been paid to this phenomenon in the context of overusing antibiotics.  Most people who go the doctor for upper respiratory infections wait to seek treatment until the condition has been present for some time.  They then go to the doctor, ask for antibiotics, take antibiotics, and recover from the condition.  These persons then assume that the antibiotics caused the improvement.  The problem with the assumption is that most of these persons almost certainly had viral infections that simply got better according to the natural course of the condition.  ANTIOBIOTICS DO NOT AFFECT VIRUSES AT ALL.  The fact that the condition improved after starting antibiotics was due to the simple fact that the person started the antibiotics at about the time the condition would improve on its own.  The antibiotics had nothing to do with the condition improving because ANTIBIOTICS ARE 100% INEFFECTIVE AGAINST VIRUSES

The same holds true for many persons with low back pain who undergo surgery to remove a herniated disc.  Low back pain usually stabilizes over time after an acute exacerbation regardless of treatment.  Given enough time, it is highly likely that the person would have gotten better or at least recovered to the same extent regardless of the treatment received (including no treatment).  The fact that the person improved after surgery does not indicate that the surgery caused the improvement.  Instead, the relation of surgery and improved low back pain is almost certainly coincidental.  We regress to the mean.  That the surgery occurred and improvement subsequently happened is not evidence that the surgery was effective or that the herniated disc was causing the low back pain.

How do we know this?  The medical literature is replete with evidence to that end.  Take for example the study, “Influence of Low Back Pain and Prognostic Value of MRI in Sciatica Patients in Relation to Back Pain.”  The study was undertaken to evaluate the correlation between MRI findings and outcomes in patients with sciatica alone versus patients with sciatica and back pain.  As the authors note, “it remains unclear to what extent morphological changes seen on MRI in sciatica patients are associated with back pain, rather than being a representation of irrelevant differences between individuals.”  The study found “that herniated discs and nerve root compression on MRI were more prevalent among patients with predominantly sciatica compared to those who suffered from additional back pain.”  Interestingly, patients with sciatica and low back pain but without a herniated disc or nerve root compression fared worse after one year than those patients with a herniated disc or nerve root compression.  And “remarkably large disc herniations and extruded disc herniations were … equally distributed between the two groups,” causing the authors to conclude that “the worldwide accepted mechanical compression theory therefore seems not to offer a sufficient explanation for the cause of the disabling back and leg symptoms in sciatica.” 

Other studies demonstrate similar findings that call into question our ability to assign causation of low back pain to herniated discs and nerve root compression.  The well-known twin study demonstrates the difficulty in linking specific activities with low back pain.  As the authors in that study report, “disc degeneration appears to be determined in great part by genetic influences. Although environmental factors also play a role, it is not primarily through routine physical loading exposures (eg, heavy vs. light physical demands) as once suspected.”  As noted above, other studies have found that large portions of the general population have disc pathology on MRI, but no low back pain.  Still other studies find low back pain in the absence of disc pathology on MRI.  Despite this evidence, triers of fact routinely base liability decisions on medical opinions that conclude an injury or exposure caused a herniated disc based on a post-injury MRI (which is almost impossible to conclude from a rational, evidentiary perspective in the absence of a pre-injury or exposure MRI) and that the herniated disc is causing low back pain (which runs contrary to the received scientific evidence).   

What does this mean for medicolegal claims?  It suggests that every claim for injury- or exposure-related back pain based on post-injury MRI scans demonstrating a herniated disc should be carefully scrutinized.  In addition, worker’s compensation and liability carriers should take every opportunity to educate triers of fact regarding the lack of a causal nexus between herniated discs and low back pain.  Independent medical examiners should point to the relevant literature to begin convincing triers of fact that there is no evidentiary link between low back pain and herniated lumbar discs.   In this regard, insurance carriers can look to how the relationship of carpal tunnel syndrome to repetitive keyboard use evolved over time.  When these claims first started arising, triers of fact in worker’s compensation accepted the link based on treating physician opinions seemingly without question.  This was based on the fact that claimants reported experiencing symptoms while using computer keyboards.  The medical literature did not support this association.  Independent medical examiners began citing to research finding the opposite:  that repetitive keyboarding is not a risk factor for or a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome.  In at least some jurisdictions, the triers of fact and treating physicians eventually listened and stopped finding a relationship between repetitive keyboarding and carpal tunnel syndrome. 

A similar shift ought to occur in the context of herniated discs and low back pain.  While this does not suggest that low back pain itself is unrelated to an injury or exposure, it would radically reduce costs because it would limit surgery for herniated discs to cases where there is discernible nerve impingement causing motor and sensory deficits rather than in cases of low back pain alone.  Although human beings are not very good at accurately assessing causation, we can learn to go against our instincts if there is high quality evidence denying causation and experts willing to hammer that point home.  It is time to hammer home the point that disc pathology on MRI is poorly correlated to low back pain and limit expensive surgical procedures the efficacy of which is not supported by the medical literature.  The simple fact of the matter is that costs for treating a condition that cannot be reliably related to an accident or repetitive stress exposure should not be borne by a liability or worker’s compensation carrier (especially when the condition is poorly correlated with the alleged health effects).

Employment-related meniscus tears are among the more common worker’s compensation claims.  The reasons are myriad but are influenced by the fact that most people develop degenerative meniscus tears as they age and the mechanism of injury for an acute tear merely involves twisting the knee, which can occur in even the lightest and most sedentary occupations because all workers who are not wheelchair-bound walk which means all workers are at risk of twisting their knee in a slip, trip, or fall at the workplace.  Setting aside the possibility that such an event is idiopathic, if a worker seeks medical treatment for knee pain following an industrial event and a meniscus tear is discovered on an MRI the treating physician usually relates the tear to the event.  Standard treatment in most such cases is usually surgical excision of the loose or torn meniscal tissue, more commonly known as a meniscectomy.  The assumption driving the surgery is that the meniscus tear is causing the knee pain and resecting the tear will eliminate the pain.  The problem with this scenario is that most meniscus tears are degenerative and there is no high quality research demonstrating that meniscectomy is an effective treatment for degenerative meniscus tears.  In fact, when researchers recently studied the question they found that exercise was equally effective as meniscectomy to treat knee pain in the presence of a degenerative meniscus tear, according to results published in the British Medical Journal (“BMJ”).

In the worker’s compensation setting, the argument is often made that an industrial event extended a preexisting degenerative meniscus tear in order to justify the surgical intervention (and coverage of the procedure under a worker’s compensation insurance policy).  The cost of meniscectomies to the worker’s compensation system is substantial.  The medical expenses alone are significantly higher for surgery than for conservative care.  In addition, meniscectomies often result in some permanent partial disability.  For example, a meniscectomy in Wisconsin carries with it a 5% minimum PPD rating to the lower extremity at the level of the knee and under the AMA Guides a meniscectomy typically results in at least a 1% impairment rating.  Surgery also typically necessitates a period of temporary total disability in non-sedentary workers.  The findings of the BMJ study should give every employer and worker’s compensation insurer pause and an editorial advocating systemic prohibition of using arthroscopy to treat knee pain that appears in the same issue should spur change.

First, a few things about the study itself.  The BMJ study is a level 1, properly designed randomized controlled trial.  This is the highest category of medical studies and is considered to produce the best and most reliable evidence available.  The BMJ study was conducted in Norway and was a randomized control trial with two parallel intervention groups of 70 patients per group.  One group received exercise alone and the other group received partial meniscectomy alone.  The participants were 35-60 year old persons of both sexes with a 2+ month history of unilateral knee pain without a major trauma but with a verified medial meniscus tear verified on MRI and no worse than grade 2 arthritic changes on x-ray.  The study found that there was no difference in outcomes between the two groups at 3 months and 24 months post-intervention.  The meniscectomy group reported better function and greater participation in sports and recreation at 12 months post-intervention, but the effect was gone by 24 months.  The authors could “not exclude the possibility that the greater placebo effect from surgery on patient outcomes” may have “mask[ed] the ‘real’ difference in treatment between the groups,” which they postulated could explain the temporary effects observed in the meniscectomy group.

More striking even than the study findings is the accompanying editorial.  The authors of the editorial call for a systemic level rule to prevent unnecessary knee arthroscopies from being performed to treat knee pain.  As they note, in the last decade:

A series of rigorous trials, summarized in two recent reviews and meta-analyses, provide compelling evidence that arthroscopic knee surgery offers little benefit for most patients with knee pain.  The latest nail into what should be a sealing coffin appears in a linked paper by Kise and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.i3740):  a rigorous comparison between exercise alone and arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone (without any postoperative rehabilitation) in adults with degenerative meniscus tear.  The authors found no between group difference in patient reported function at the two year follow-up…

The editorial authors note there has never been high quality research supporting meniscectomy in an older population with degenerative meniscus tears, but that the procedure was extended to this population based on unverified assumptions:

With no support aside from biological rationale, the indication crept from locked knees in young patients to all patients of all ages with knee pain and meniscus tears of any sort; tears which, on magnetic resonance imaging, have proved poorly associated with symptoms. 

The conclusion they reach is both astonishing and harsh:

We are at the point where any careful scrutiny, by, for instance, public health administrators or officials of an insurance company, would conclude that the estimated two million arthroscopic partial meniscectomies undertaken globally each year at a cost of several billion US dollars is potentially nothing but medical waste. Because frontline practitioners and local commissioners have not responded appropriately to the evidence, it follows that system level measures that result in more appropriate use of scarce medical resources are necessary—and perhaps urgently required.

In short, the authors believe the evidence against arthroscopy to treat knee pain is so strong and the evidence for it is so weak that health systems as a whole should stop paying for these procedures.  Such a rule would have a significant impact on worker’s compensation claims where meniscectomies are routinely performed to treat degenerative meniscus tears.

5/20/2016 in Blog Categories, News, Treatment

We are inundated with messages about the opioid crisis in America.  According to the CDC 28,000 people died due to opioid overdose in 2014, at least half of which occurred while using prescription painkillers.  There is also evidence that heroin use is increasing as prescription opioids become harder to obtain.  In fact, the CDC reports that prescription opioid painkiller use is strongest risk factor for heroin addiction.  Those in the worker’s compensation field have seen firsthand the devastation addiction to prescription opioids can cause.  In addition to the tragic human costs, cases involving long term prescription opioid painkiller use often have high economic costs that include significant lost time and failure to return to work in addition to the cost of the prescriptions themselves.  And this doesn’t begin to touch on the cost that are imposed on the social safety net when long term opioid painkiller use turns into permanent disability.  The bottom line is that an effective alternative to prescription opioid painkiller use in chronic pain cases would improve lives, improve society, and most importantly save lives.

The Journal of the American Medical Association (“JAMA”) recently published a report addressing whether mindfulness-based stress reduction might be that effective alternative.  The report notes that the CDC recommends physicians “try nonpharmacologic and nonopioid therapies first,” before using opioid painkillers.  Hence, it is becoming imperative for physicians to explore alternatives to simply prescribing painkillers.  According to the report,  “limited research indicates that mindfulness meditation for pain management therapy has promise.”  For example, a recent study found that adding mindfulness meditation to a standard pain treatment program increased the percentage of patients who reported meaningful pain reduction from 26.6% to 44.9%.  Obviously this is a significant finding.  Unfortunately, there are no studies that compare mindfulness-based stress reduction directly with opioid use.  The report stresses the importance of performing direct comparison, double-blinded, randomized studies to measure the effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction compared to prescription opioid painkillers.

So why does mindfulness-based stress reduction appear to help at all?  There are a number of reasons, but chief among them is the understanding that “pain is a complex phenomenon involving more than a direct nerve impulse from the affected tissue or limb to the somatic sensory cortex” and that “a person’s thoughts and emotions also play a role in pain perception.”  This has helped physicians to focus on treatment modalities that “shift chronic pain treatment from a ‘biomedical disease model’ to a ‘patient-centered’ model focused on ‘patient engagement in daily self-management.’”  The key is shift between improved quality of life versus elimination of pain, which is often impossible.  This turns the patient’s attention away from pain and disability and toward behavioral and psychological interventions and techniques to improve her quality of life.  In the words of a mindfulness meditation study participant, “I felt the pain was there, but I was able to let it go. I didn’t dwell on it so much.”

Whether mindfulness-based stress reduction will prove to be a substitute or an effective alternative to prescription opioid painkillers remains to be seen.  Nevertheless, the growing awareness that chronic pain is different from and needs to be treated differently than acute pain is positive.  The trend is moving toward interventions in chronic pain patients that focus on learning strategies to cope with their pain which in turn increases their ability to function at higher levels.  And higher levels of functioning mean less catastrophizing, less disability, and ultimately, less death.  A happy coincidence is that it also means a reduction in worker’s compensation costs. 

Any person who spends time in claims has run into files in which a patient with back pain has undergone “provocative discography.”  The procedure involves injecting intervertebral discs suspected of causing the claimant’s pain with fluid along with “healthy control” discs.  Purportedly, if the claimant feels an increase of pain in the suspected disc compared to the “control” discs, then the suspected disc is confirmed as being the cause of the claimant’s back pain.  The problem is threefold.  First, studies have determined that provocative discography cannot do what it is supposed to do.  It cannot identify “discogenic pain.”  Second, studies have definitively concluded that not only is provocative discography an ineffective diagnostic tool but also that it causes the degeneration of injected intervertebral discs to accelerate.  Third, a recent study published in The Spine Journal (subscription required) found in a 10 year study that provocative discography performed on persons without back complaints actually led to back pain and surgical intervention.  Healthnewsreviews.org has an outstanding piece about the study and the lack of coverage in the health news media.  This is important because even today, with knowledge that provocative discography is an ineffective diagnostic tool, 70,000 procedures are performed annually in the United States.  Anyone involved in medico-legal claims should read the Healthnewsreviews.org piece.  Here are some of the highlights:

Experts say that provocative discography has no proven benefit for identifying symptomatic discs and has previously been shown on magnetic resonance imaging to be associated with faster degeneration of injected discs. The new study followed 75 patients who received the injections and compared them to 75 matched controls. The point of the new study was to see whether the disc degeneration seen on MRI would translate into clinically important back pain symptoms.

There was no significant history of back pain in either group when the study began. But the new 10-year data showed that there were more back pain surgeries (16 vs. 4); more frequent sciatica and back pain syndromes, and greater work loss and doctor visits for low back pain in the punctured discs compared to controls.

Such is the import of this study that an orthopedic surgeon interviewed as part of the article flat out stated:

“But readers should be aware that a trial of this sort with 10 years of follow up is very compelling evidence of discography’s potential problems,” Rickert says. “Such long term studies are rare,” he adds, and this one should tell readers: “Do not go undergo provocative discography.”

Perhaps the best summary was provided by another doctor consulted for the article.  Steven Atlas, MD, MPH, told Healthnewsreviews.org:

So, not surprisingly, results are not very reliable. We also know that patients who have fusion based upon findings of provocative discography don’t do any better than individuals who have surgery but don’t undergo this test. We also know that patients can report more pain after the procedure, including pain they didn’t have before the procedure. And now we know that there are long-term risks associated with discography.

The article is worth reading in its entirety.  One hopes that discography and its costs, both direct and indirect, will soon disappear from the health care landscape.  In the meantime, claims professionals should expect their IME doctors on back pain cases to be familiar with the study and use it in their reports when treating physicians recommend or actually perform provocative discography and use it to diagnose the cause of back pain and the need for surgery.

It hurts.  Yes it does.  But what does that mean?  Does it mean that I shouldn’t do it?  Perhaps not.  In fact, the inhibitory effects of pain can actually be deleterious to our health.  Ordinarily, pain is a mechanism that helps us avoid injury, i.e. the classic nociceptive response to touching something that is hot.  However, there are many cases in which pain can prevent us from doing things that are actually good for us.  One such example is leg pain in peripheral artery disease.  

The New York Times recently ran an article about leg pain and peripheral artery disease (“PAD”).  PAD is essentially atherosclerosis in the extremities as opposed to the cardiac arteries.  It causes many problems, including leg pain.  Ironically, exercise is one of the recommended treatments for PAD (and the leg pain it causes), but many never pursue exercise because when a person with PAD starts exercising it causes more leg pain.  Eventually, the leg pain diminishes, but the start of exercise precipitates an increase in pain.  As the Times article reports, those who work through the pain generally experience both a decrease in pain and an increase in function.  This is instructive for those of us involved in medico-legal claims, where complaints of pain often thwart a return to normal function.

Pain is often an intractable part of medico-legal claims.  A person is involved in an accident or alleges an occupation-related condition, receives treatment (often surgery), and recovers physiologically from the injury.  Unfortunately, this is not the end of the story.  Instead of returning to full functionality, the person remains impaired and cites “pain” to explain the ongoing loss of function.  For everyone involved in medico-legal claims, the problem of “pain” causing ongoing loss of function is incredibly frustrating.  Pain does not, however, have to be an intractable problem.

The biggest hurdle to overcoming residual pain in the context of an injury claim is overcoming the normal response to nociceptive pain, which is the nervous system’s way of limiting physical harm.  Think of the proverbial hand on a hot stove:  the nerves send a pain message to the brain, you move your hand to avoid getting burned.  Although the nociceptive response is marvelous for such acute tissue insults, it is not particularly useful for dealing with pain related to atrophy, deconditioning, or surgical changes to tissues.  Nociception is not useful in this circumstances because pain is not a signal of the tissue-yielding associate with injury, but rather with the tissue-yielding necessary to rebuild strength and function that is lost with atrophy, deconditioning, and surgical changes to tissues.  As everyone knows, increasing one’s activity level after periods of deconditioning results in soreness; however, everyone also knows that being sore should not prevent further workouts.  If every person who lost fitness and wanted to regain it allowed pain to dictate their activity levels, few if any would ever become fit again.  The same process obtains after the atrophy, deconditioning, and surgical changes that occur following injury and convalescence.  Hence, it is perfectly normal for a person with an injury to experience pain with the rehabilitation that occurs after the injured or repaired tissues have healed.  This pain is not injurious but instead is a normal part of the rehabilitation process.

Convincing persons with injury claims that the pain associated with atrophy, deconditioning, and surgical changes is normal during rehabilitation can be challenging but it is not impossible.  A large part of the challenge lies in overcoming the natural human tendency to conserve energy.  Put simply, basic survival requires that all living organisms (including humans) expend less energy than they take in.  For contemporary Americans this is problematic because we do not have to expend much energy to meet our basic survival needs and we have access to a surfeit of relatively cheap calories.  In other words, the contemporary American economy makes it easy for most Americans to be sedentary.  If a person is accustomed to being sedentary, she already exists in a deconditioned state.  Whether or not she intentionally avoids activity-related soreness matters little because she doesn’t experience it either way.  Absent injury, she can maintain an inactive lifestyle and will, as we normally do, avoid doing things that cause pain.  This state of deconditioning and pain avoidance, which are normal consequences of being human in much of America today, predisposes persons to have problems when rehabilitating an injury.

As noted above, the problem can be solved.  First, treating practitioners should explain from the earliest opportunity that recovery requires effort and the effort itself with hurt.  It is absolutely critical that injured persons understand recovery requires hard work and is almost always painful.  Fair or not, this is normal and injured persons should expect it.  Second, treating practitioners ought to have frank discussions about the role deconditioning will play in their injured patients’ recoveries.  Doing so is not paternalistic, it is instead being honest.  It is also critical in an era in which healthcare practitioners are increasingly being judged by patient outcomes.  For example, being 50 pounds overweight will make recovery from an ACL tear harder because the rehabilitation will be physically taxing to many uninjured parts of the injured person’s body.  Rehabilitation will tax the person’s cardiovascular system and the uninjured joints of the person’s back, hips, opposite knee, and ankles.  Being deconditioned means rehabilitation will hurt more and be more difficult.  Injured persons need to understand this going into rehabilitation. 

Merely knowing pain will be part of rehabilitation is necessary but not sufficient to overcome the inhibitory effects of pain.  Healthcare providers should demand that injured persons who undergo treatment demonstrate the ability to differentiate between pain associated with acute injury or harm and pain associated with rehabilitation, i.e. pain associated with increasing fitness.  Surely knowledgeable physical therapists and other rehabilitation specialists should be able to demonstrate the difference in addition to explaining it.  Healthcare providers should also demand that patients acknowledge that recovery from injury requires determination and that patients pledge to give full effort, even when experiencing the normal pain or discomfort associated with rehabilitation.  Obviously there are limits to the binding effects of such a pledge, but it would help to put injured patients into the right mindset to tackle rehabilitation effectively and with full effort.  Patients could also be told that their ability to receive rehabilitation services will depend on the effort level they give in therapy and in performing all recommended home exercises.  This could easily be measured with periodic functional testing such as range of motion measurement, strength testing, and endurance testing.  This would be no different than a spine surgeon refusing to perform a fusion on patients with a history of smoking until the patients can demonstrate that they have stopped smoking. 

Obviously there are other issues that impact a medico-legal claimant’s ability to deal with residual pain from the claimed accident or occupational exposure.  Dealing with all of these aspects would require more space and time than this blog allows.  For example, everyone acknowledges that psychosocial factors play a large role in many claimants’ recoveries.  In addition, motivation to return to work or full functionality plays a similarly large role.  Nevertheless, the healthcare profession can do much to educate claimants on the difference between pain that signals injury and pain that signals recovery.  As in peripheral artery disease patients who start to exercise, patients rehabilitating from an injury are almost certain to experience pain during rehabilitation.  It is critical that the therapists and other healthcare providers involved in the rehabilitation process do everything in their power to prevent patients from giving anything less than full effort due to non-injurious and amorphous complaints of “pain.”  Doing so will set claimant-patients on the right track to recovery and will help get them out of the mindset that pain justifies inactivity.  Like the peripheral artery disease patients, claimants who get past the initial pain will find their condition to be much improved.  And that is what everyone in medico-legal claims really wants.

Last week psychiatrist Jeffrey Zigun, M.D. and psychologist Brad Grunert, Ph.D. spoke at Medical Systems’ 2016 Advanced Medical Topics in Civil Litigation Symposium on mild traumatic brain injury.  Three topics came up repeatedly during the individual experts’ presentations and in the follow-up panel discussion:

  1. Can traumatic brain injuries get worse over time?
  2. What role does pre-injury intelligence play in recovery?
  3. How is the fact of a mild traumatic brain injury identified?

The answers to the first two of the three issues are surprisingly simple, while the answer to the third is, or at least can be, much more complicated.

With respect to the question of whether mild traumatic brain injuries can get worse over time, the simple answer according to the experts is “no.”  Both Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert were clear in their statement that recovery from mild traumatic brain injury follows a predictable recovery.  The physical injury to the brain itself reaches maximum medical improvement within a year and all expected improvements in functioning occur within two years of the injury.  This is significant because a number of participants in the seminar reported scenarios in which a claimant/plaintiff experienced a precipitous decrease in functioning 12, 18, or even 24+ months after the initial injury.  In at least some cases, the decrease in functioning was measured on neuropsychiatric testing and was deemed not to be malingering.  Both Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert were clear in their presentations and in the panel discussions that such a decrease in functioning would not be due to an underlying mild traumatic brain injury, even if the injury were permanent.  Brain injuries get better over time; they don’t yo-yo up and down or suddenly get worse after a period of improvement.  Unfortunately, a decrease in functioning after a period of improvement can still be related to the accident.  More on this later.

One of the more interesting aspects of the symposium was the discussions about the role of intelligence in recovery from a mild traumatic brain injury.  The experts both stressed that intelligence is enormously important in assessing how individuals will recover from permanent mild traumatic brain injury.  The reason is that those with more intelligence have more to lose before the loss of function becomes a significant impairment.  The example Dr. Grunert used was an academic researcher:  she may have some memory impairment following a mild traumatic brain injury, but it may only mean that she has to look up citations she previously had memorized.  This will obviously add some time to her research, but it will not impair the quality of the research itself or her ability to write.  On the other hand, a factory worker who has to follow a specific procedure when operating a dangerous machine will have no margin for error.  If her memory was on the lower end of average to begin with, losing any amount of memory function could cause her to be unable to follow the specific procedure when operating machinery.  Since there is no margin of error, the factory worker’s memory impairment would cost her the ability to do her job.  Hence, one point both Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert made was that impairment following mild traumatic brain injury is often different for persons of high intelligence than it is for persons of lower intelligence.

The trickiest question the experts dealt with is how to determine the fact of a traumatic brain injury.  In many cases a person hits their head and the symptoms of concussion are obvious.  These might include brief loss of consciousness, dizziness, retrograde and/or anterograde amnesia, headache, wooziness, etc.  In other cases the fact of injury might be less obvious.  Perhaps the person did not strike their head in a motor vehicle crash, but reported some symptoms consistent with mild traumatic brain injury.  Further complicating matters are cases where there is a preexisting history of psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, or other psychological diagnoses.  In all cases, Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert stressed the importance of early neuropsychological testing.  Dr. Grunert noted that neuropsychological testing has a high degree of reliability and specificity.  In addition, neuropsychological testing is good at ferreting out malingering from legitimate claims.  Early testing also establishes a baseline from which test results should not decline in mild traumatic brain injury. 

As the experts and the audience discussed, often the fact of injury is not an issue at the beginning of a claim, though.  Instead, the fact of injury becomes an issue after a year or more.  Usually, this seems to occur as a result of a decline in functioning, whether supported through neuropsychiatric testing or not.  As the experts agreed, simply because a person declines in functioning after a mild traumatic brain injury should have stabilized does not mean that they are not continuing to suffer from a permanent brain injury or that the decline in function is not legitimate or related to the accident.  Both Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert agreed that a decline in functioning a year or more after a mild traumatic brain injury only means that the brain injury itself is probably not responsible for the decline in functioning.  Instead, they pointed to psychological conditions as often being the culprit. 

When the audience heard this, many persons wanted to know if the psychological conditions would be related to the accident, especially if there was a preexisting history.  As Dr. Zigun noted numerous times, it depends.  For example, Dr. Zigun addressed the simple fact that many of the drugs used to treat psychological conditions also have positive effects on the sequelae from traumatic brain injury.  Take SSRIs, commonly used to treat depression.  Dr. Zigun pointed out that one symptom of depression is memory impairment, which is also a symptom of mild traumatic brain injury.   SSRIs help alleviate memory impairment in both depression and mild traumatic brain injury.  Dr. Zigun noted that if a person is diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury, they may very well end up on an SSRI.  Once the brain injury stabilizes, the person may be weaned off the SSRI.  However, if the person has simultaneously developed depression, weaning her from the SSRI may cause a decrease in functioning related to the depression, including worsening memory impairment.  Both experts agreed that the decrease in functioning in such a case could be legitimate but that it would not be related to the mild traumatic brain injury.

How, then, can we determine if a decline in functioning relates to the accident?  The answer, unfortunately, is not clear cut.  The experts stressed that to evaluate whether a decline in functioning, once determined to be legitimate and not malingering, relates to an accident, the analysis essentially looks to the totality of the circumstances to attempt to parse out the causal factors.  The case a number of audience members brought up was the situation in which there is a preexisting history of a psychological condition such as depression which is determined to be the reason for the post-accident decline in functioning.  Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert agreed that it is exceptionally difficult to determine whether the development of a psychological condition is accident-related.  They noted that many factors could cause the onset of depression episode that would be related to the accident.  For example, if the mild traumatic brain injury caused a memory impairment that prevents the injured person from returning to work, it would not be unusual for the person to develop depression.  The depression would not be caused by the brain injury itself, but rather would be the result of the job loss, which resulted from the brain injury.  On the other hand, if the injured person has recovered well and is coping with any residual impairments from the brain injury, the depression is likely to be independent of the brain injury.  The bottom line is that declines in psychological functioning in the context of a permanent mild traumatic brain injuries present challenging cases for experts in which causation can only be determined by assessing the totality of the circumstances.

 Mild traumatic brain injuries can present vexing cases for claims professionals.  As Dr. Zigun and Dr. Grunert discussed, mild traumatic brain injuries can be diagnosed and treated effectively, even in the case of concomitant psychological conditions.  We are grateful for their participation in Medical Systems’ 2016 Advanced Medical Topics in Civil Litigation Symposium and for the many insights they shared with our audience.  

When we think of traumatic brain injury, we typically think of symptoms primarily related to cognition and executive function.  Hence, we expect to see memory deficits, difficulty concentrating, and difficulty regulating emotions.  We associate the brain with thinking so we often focus on the symptoms related to thinking despite the fact that traumatic brain injury can cause a host of physical symptoms as well.

One of the most troubling physical symptoms is the potential for traumatic brain injury to disrupt the body’s circadian rhythm, or its normal sleeping/waking cycle.   According to a 2012 Public Library of Science study, traumatic brain injury, “disrupts the oscillatory expression pattern of several circadian clock and clock-associated genes” in the areas of the brain primarily responsible for regulating the sleep/wake cycle (the suprachiasmic nuclie, or SCN, and hippocampus).  In short, traumatic brain injury interferes with our ability to sleep normally.  Interestingly, this sleep-impairing aspect of traumatic brain injury has effects on our cognition: 

Since the hippocampus mediates learning, memory and cognition, and diurnal regulation by the SCN is essential for proper hippocampal function, disruption of the oscillatory gene expression patterns in these two brain areas seems likely to play a role in the long-term cognitive effects of TBI.

In short, if you don’t sleep normally you don’t think normally.  This is problematic for other reasons also since sleep disruption is known to increase the likelihood of developing depression, bipolar disorder, diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic disorders. 

The wide-ranging and myriad effects of traumatic brain injury make it essential to obtain an accurate diagnosis early in the process to ensure that the best available treatment is offered.  While at least 80% of persons with mild traumatic brain injury will experience a complete recovery, there is small but nontrivial subset of patients whose symptoms will persist as chronic problems.  If we are going to administer traumatic brain injury claims effectively, it is imperative that we understand many of the effects from traumatic brain injury are not primarily cognitive in nature but rather are physical.   

To learn more about how the physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects of traumatic brain injury relate, check out Medical Systems’ 2016 Advanced Medical Topics in Civil Litigation Symposium on April 7, 2016.

There are certain medical procedures that are so common in worker’s compensation that we don’t give them a second thought.  Partial meniscectomy is among them.  Most people assume that an employee with a torn meniscus who is experiencing catching and locking in their knee should have a partial meniscectomy to treat the symptoms, regardless of whether we think the meniscus tear is work-related.  Turns out that our assumption might be wrong.

The Annals of Internal Medicine published results from a study (subscription required) which found that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is ineffective for relieving catching and locking symptoms in the knee.  The study was conducted on a group of patients with medial knee pain who had confirmed meniscus tears without evidence of arthritis.  The participants in the study were randomly assigned to either the treatment group, which received the partial meniscectomy, or a control group, who received a sham arthroscopy.  Participants were not aware of which group they were in to control possible bias. 

The results of the study were surprising because in every reported measure, the patients undergoing the sham procedure reported fewer mechanical symptoms post-surgery.  The most impressive results were among those patients reporting that they were symptom free following the procedure.  Among this group, only 28% of the participants undergoing the actual partial meniscectomy reported being symptom-free while 41% of the participants who underwent the sham procedure reported being symptom-free.  The study’s authors were quick to note, however, that trauma-related meniscus tears causing mechanical symptoms in persons under 35 do respond well to partial meniscectomy.  On the other hand, they pointed out that “in a degenerative knee, seemingly similar symptoms may not even be caused by the meniscal tear - more likely they are a reflection of the overall deterioration of the knee and prone to increase as arthritis develops further.

In the worker’s compensation context, the dispute is typically whether a meniscus tear is traumatic or degenerative.  Regardless, the ineffectiveness and the possibility that the symptoms might be “a reflection of the overall deterioration of the knee and prone to increase as arthritis develops further” is a good reason to tread cautiously when an employee is diagnosed with a meniscus tear.  If the employee’s meniscus tear is degenerative in nature, there is a strong likelihood that a partial meniscectomy will have a temporary benefit at best and in the long run will not ameliorate or slow the progression of degenerative arthritis.  Hence, a meniscus tear in an older worker that is deemed to be work-related is highly likely to become an arthritic knee that will need to be replaced.  And despite the fact that it is bad medicine and bad science, the arthritis is likely to be blamed on the meniscus tear even though the arthritis was probably the problem in the first place.  Hence, it behooves every claims professional to take a serious look at meniscus claims and to defend them vigorously now that we know the proposed surgery may very well not work and may very well lead to additional (more costly) claims.

Pain is a problem that is frequently treated with painkillers.  As we are all aware, this has led to a significant problem with addiction to and overdose from opioid painkillers in this country.  The reasons for the crisis in prescription opioid addiction and overdose are myriad and have been discussed extensively here and elsewhere.  This post is not about the problem, but instead about an opportunity to address it.

The NY Times recently posted an article about the potential to harness the placebo effect to help treat pain which offers an intriguing possibility in the struggle to treat pain without causing addiction and overdose.  As Jo Marchant reports, “even when we take a real painkiller, a big chunk of the effect is delivered not by any direct chemical action, but by our expectation that that drug will work.  Studies show that widely used painkillers like morphine, buprenorphine and tramadol are markedly less effective if we don’t know we’re taking them.”  In fact, placebo effects are so powerful “that drug manufacturers are finding it hard to beat them.”  Hence, Marchant suggests that more research should be done to figure out if “prescription” placebos could be used to treat pain.

Marchant recognizes the difficulty with placebos:  namely that the effect is generally observed in clinical trials where individuals don’t know if they are getting the active drug or a placebo.  In controlled studies, patients expect they will receive a drug that will improve their condition even though they know they might in fact get a placebo.  This, as Marchant notes, appears to be a key component of the placebo effect:  “[t]he greater our belief that a treatment will work, the better we’ll respond.”  There have, however, been studies in which patients knowingly taking placebos still reported statistically significant improvement in their reported level of pain.  This leads Marchant to ask the eminently reasonable question, “[w]ith placebo responses in pain so high – and the risks of drugs so severe – why not prescribe a course of ‘honest’ placebos for those who wish to try it, before proceeding, if necessary, to an active drug?”

Pain is ubiquitous in our society and, when chronic, often proves disabling.  We know from experience that prescribing opioid painkillers is not the answer to the problem of pain.  Perhaps it is time for those of us in the medico-legal world to use whatever muscle we have and advocate for change.  A good place to start would be the use of “honest” placebos to treat pain.

Worker’s compensation claims involving chronic pain are typically difficult and expensive to administer.  We know that simply putting a person on prescription painkillers doesn’t work, yet that is often the treatment claimants end up on.  In these cases, the end result is usually an employee who doesn’t return to work and ends up filing a long term disability or SSDI claim.  Either way, the result is not good for the employee, the employer, or the worker’s compensation insurance carrier.

Fortunately, the medical research community is tackling the issue head-on.  As a result, the medical community is making some exciting strides in understanding how chronic pain works and, accordingly, what treatments are likely to be the most effective.  Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine reported on one such stride.   In an animal study, researchers discovered that chronic pain looks a lot like addiction in the brain.  As one author put it, “chronic pain actually rewires the part of the brain controlling whether you feel happy or sad.”  In other words, "The study shows you can think of chronic pain as the brain getting addicted to pain," said another author. "The brain circuit that has to do with addiction has gotten involved in the pain process itself."

With this knowledge, the study combined a Parkinson’s drug and an NSAID that target the brain area chronic pain affects.  Remarkably, the combined drugs “completely eliminate chronic pain behavior when administered to rodents with chronic pain.”  Yes, you read that right:  the drugs completely eliminate chronic pain in rodents.  Unfortunately, the study involved rodents.  Still, the authors are optimist that the effect will translate to humans and have already begun designing human trials.

This development bears following.  As those of us in the worker’s compensation world know, chronic pain is debilitating and expensive.  Also, it often devolves into chronic use of opioid pain medication that has deleterious psycho-social effects and almost guarantees injured workers will develop a disability mindset.  Any new treatment that can stop the downward spiral often associated with chronic pain claims would be a remarkable development.

Geography determines many things.  It should not, however, determine how likely you are to survive cardiac arrest.  Unfortunately, geography does just that.  According to a New York Times article, persons suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical service (“EMS”) providers in Seattle have a 19.9% survival rate while persons in Detroit have only a 3% survival rate.  It appears that the wide variation in survival rates is due primarily to the quality of the training EMS providers receive and to “spreading awareness that cardiac arrest is a treatable condition, so citizens are quick to perform bystander CPR.” 

Survival rates vary widely even for hospitalized patients treated for cardiac arrest.  For example, CPR should be attempted for a minimum of 45 minutes but is usually only performed for 15-20 minutes in clinical settings.  In addition, clinicians often fail to use more powerful interventions available to them such as extra corporeal membrane oxygenation, in which a patient’s blood is artificially oxygenated.  According to one expert interviewed for the article, extra corporeal membrane oxygenation is more common in Japan and South Korea where “they routinely bring people back to life who would remain dead here.”  Unfortunately, even in hospitals “it’s a lottery of what you will get” that largely “depend[s] on which doctor happens to receive you, since none of these treatments are regulated.” 

It is tragic that 17 out of every hundred people who could survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will not simply because they live in Detroit.  While cardiac arrest is not a medico-legal issue of the sort we normally address here, it is a human issue.  And at this time of year, many of us ask ourselves what we can do to help our fellow human beings.  Taking a CPR course that teaches up-to-date techniques is one place to start. Another place is to spread awareness that out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is treatable with immediate bystander CPR.  As the article notes, “if Seattle’s innovations could be implemented nationwide for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests…as many as 30,000 lives annually could be saved.”  That is a gift worth giving.

We recently wrote about how stunningly ineffective opioid pain medications are at treating chronic pain in women.  A new study provides a perfect example of why prescribing opioids to treat chronic pain in women is a bad idea.  Researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada found that 52% of women treated at a methadone maintenance clinic for opioid dependency developed their addiction while taking prescription painkillers, according to a report from Medical News Today.  The study’s authors concluded that women are more susceptible to become addicted when prescribed opioid pain medication, but they are not sure why.  Regardless of the reason, women’s apparent increased susceptibility should further caution prescription opioid use to manage long-term or chronic pain in women.

At Medical Systems, we don’t often see separated shoulder cases, known to medical professionals as acromioclavicular (“AC”) joint dislocations, because the injuries are acute and painful.  Hence, there usually isn’t much dispute about whether the injuries are work/accident-related or not.  Still, these injuries happen at workplaces and in personal injury accidents.  They are painful and, if severe, usually treated surgically (read, “expensively”). 

New research suggests that this is probably the wrong approach.  A recent study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma found that surgical repair of moderate and severe AC joint dislocations did not result in improved outcomes versus non-surgical repair, bucking what has been considered common knowledge among doctors.  Not only did surgery not improve patient outcomes, but patients that did not have surgery actually recovered faster.  In fact, 75% of the non-surgical patients returned to work within 3 months of the injury while only 43% of the surgical patients did.  According to the study’s author, "For severe AC joint dislocations, surgery is the common practice but there's not much evidence to suggest this is actually the best treatment."  An additional benefit is that those treated non-surgically (use of a sling and rehabilitation) suffered much lower rates of complication.  The only noticeable benefit to surgery was that the AC joint appeared more normal after surgery.

One hopes that the medical community will pay attention to the findings and stop recommending surgery for every moderate to severe AC joint dislocation.  It would seem that this would be the best result for both claimants with AC joint dislocations and claims professionals managing their claims.  

10/9/2015 in Blog Categories, News, Treatment

We have all seen the statistics on the explosion of nonmedical opioid use, abuse, and overdose that occurred with the proliferation of opioid use to treat chronic pain conditions.  A new study further calls into question the wisdom of using opioids to treat chronic pain in women.  According to research published in the Journal of Women’s Health, only 20% of women using opioids over the long term to treat chronic pain reported low levels of pain and high levels of function. In other words, using opioids over the long term to treat chronic pain is ineffective for 8 out of every ten women using them for that purpose.  With the risk of opioid addiction, misuse, and overdose as high as it is, it is frankly mind-boggling that they continue to be prescribed to treat chronic pain in a population for whom the drugs are overwhelmingly ineffective.  One hopes that continued research such as Journal of Women’s Health study and growing awareness of the ineffectiveness of long-term opioid use to treat chronic pain will eventually lead to more sensible prescription guidelines and more judicious behavior among prescribing physicians. 

Ankle fractures are not the most common injury in worker’s compensation or personal injury claims, but they do happen.  The standard protocol for uncomplicated ankle fractures is immobilization (casting) followed by a supervised exercise program (physical therapy).  Results from a recent JAMA study question whether supervised exercise improves outcomes for patients with uncomplicated ankle fractures.  In the study, the control followed the standard protocol (supervised exercise after cast removal) while the experimental group received instructions on home exercises but did not participate in a supervised exercise program.  The results demonstrated that the control group had no better outcomes in terms of activity limitations or quality of life.  The authors conclude that “findings do not support the routine use of supervised exercise programs after removal of immobilization for patients with isolated and uncomplicated ankle fracture.” 

Eliminating unnecessary physical therapy from uncomplicated ankle fracture claims presents a good opportunity to reduce claim costs.  If treating physicians are unwilling to follow the recommendations of the JAMA study’s authors, setting up an IME or a record review could be a smart move, especially if it can be done before the cast comes off.

Spinal cord injuries are devastating.  The U.S. experiences approximately 12,000 spinal cord injuries per year in which the injured person survives the initial accident.  For those who survive the initial accident, the road forward is physically arduous, psychologically taxing, and financially burdensome.  A spinal cord injury patient can expect to spend well over a month in hospitals and in-patient rehabilitation (and sometimes considerably longer dependent on the severity of the injury and whether there are concomitant cognitive impairments or other comorbidities).  In addition, the lifetime costs of spinal cord injuries are extensive, having a present day value ranging from $4,540,000 for a 20-year-old patient with high tetraplegia (spinal cord injury at C1-C4) to $1,460,000 for a 60-year-old patient with paraplegia.  The occupational effects are profound, with only 35% of spinal cord injury patients able to achieve a similar pre-injury level of employment 20 years post-injury.  Obviously, the costs to employers and worker’s compensation carriers in work-related spinal cord injury claims are enormous and usually lifelong.  The costs of spinal cord injuries are massive in the liability context as well.  Since the two most common causes of spinal cord injuries are motor vehicle crashes and falls, liability and worker’s compensation claims are relatively common when spinal cord injuries occur. 

Certainly no one did more to raise awareness of spinal cord injuries than Christopher Reeve, who suffered a spinal cord injury causing high tetraplegia (C1-C2) after falling from a horse in 1995.  Periodically high profile athlete suffer spinal cord injuries that thrust the issue back into the national spotlight.   In 2010, Rutgers football player Eric LeGrande sustained a spinal cord injury during a game against army that initially left him paralyzed from the neck down.  In October 1995, Travis Roy was just 11 seconds into his first shift in his first game as a hockey player for Boston University when he crashed head-first into the boards and suffered a spinal cord injury that also paralyzed him from the neck down.  More recently, Olympic swimmer and multiple gold medal-winning swimmer Amy Van Dyken suffered a spinal cord injury away from athletics in June 2014 when she fell off the all-terrain vehicle she was driving and down a 5-7 foot embankment.  The accident injured her spinal cord at T11 and left her paralyzed from the waist down. 

These famous athletes and celebrities periodically remind us of both the risk and devastating consequences of spinal cord injury.  Fortunately, progress is being made in managing the post-injury effects of spinal cord injury.  The most frequently reported-on developments typically involve bionic exoskeletons that help the paralyzed person move their limbs.  However, recently medical researchers have been making strides in using electrical stimulation to allow the injured patient voluntarily move paralyzed limbs.  In recently reported research, external electrodes were placed over 5 patients’ spinal columns who have suffered from paraplegia for at least two years.  The electrodes in combination with the drug buspirone allowed the patients to move their limbs under stimulation, which was not unexpected.  What was remarkable is that the patients retained the ability to move their legs even without electrical stimulation after 4 weeks of treatment.  As lead researcher Prof. V. Reggie Edgerton noted, "The fact that they regained voluntary control so quickly must mean that they had neural connections that were dormant, which we reawakened."  The findings are considered remarkable because the medical and scientific community had accepted that persons with complete paralysis “no longer had any neural connections in the spinal area.;” suggesting that it may be possible to regain motor function without regenerating spinal neurons or using an exoskeleton system.

This research along with the mind-boggling progress that is being made with patient-controlled exoskeleton devices is changing the landscape for spinal cord injury patients.  These developments are welcome news for patients, their families, and society alike.  As noted above, the occupational and medical costs of spinal cord injuries are enormous.  Anything that can return function to patients has the potential to minimize the occupational impact and long-term medical expenses of spinal cord injuries, which is good news for the worker’s compensation and civil liability systems as well.  Spinal cord injuries are among the most costly injuries to everyone involved.  Improving outcomes in spinal cord injuries will benefit an extraordinary number of individual lives and also the institutions set up to absorb the costs.

Medical News Today has an article on exciting research in the pharmacological management of chronic pain.  The research, published in Neuron, found that persons with a particular genetic profile experience considerably less low back pain than the general population.  Such persons have a gene variant that causes them to produce less of the protein BH4 than normal.  Researchers postulated that BH4 is at least partly responsible for the development of chronic nerve pain.  To test the hypothesis, they engineered mice to overproduce BH4 and found these mice were hypersensitive to pain even without injury.  They then engineered mice that produced no BH4 and found those mice to have considerably less sensitive to pain than normal. 

The real breakthrough, however, was in the researchers’ next step:  pharmacological control of BH4.  "We wanted to use pharmacologic means to get the same effect as the gene variant," says Alban Latremoliere, PhD, of Boston Children's Kirby Center, who led the current study.  As Medical News Today reports, the researchers caused a peripheral nerve injury in laboratory mice and then “blocked BH4 production using a specifically designed drug that targets sepiapterin reductase (SPR), a key enzyme that makes BH4. The drug reduced the pain hypersensitivity induced by the nerve injury (or accompanying inflammation) but did not affect nociceptive pain--the protective pain sensation that helps us avoid injury.”  This could be a hugely important development in the pharmacological management of chronic pain in people as the method would offer an option that could effectively manage pain without any of the addictive or other deleterious effects of narcotic pain medication.  

Claims with chronic whiplash symptoms that develop after a low-speed motor vehicle accident are often difficult.  The defense points to imaging studies that do not demonstrate evidence of pathology.  The plaintiff points to a prior history of normal health without any neck problems or pain complaints.  Each side points to their evidence and asks the jury (if the case goes to trial) to reach their preferred conclusion:

  1. No pathology on imaging studies; therefore, the plaintiff did not suffer a permanent injury in the accident; or
  2. No prior history of neck complaints.  The accident occurs and then there are consistent reports of complaints; therefore, the accident caused the ongoing complaints.

The defense will point to the low speed of the impact to demonstrate that their position is more credible, i.e. the speed was so low no person could have suffered more than a minor, temporary neck strain.  The plaintiff will try to counter this with evidence that the speed of the striking vehicle at impact cannot accurately convey the forces transmitted to the plaintiff’s cervical spinal column and musculature.  In truth, there is little direct evidence that supports either side’s position in these claims. 

That may be changing, though.  Researchers at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University have uncovered what may be objective evidence supporting the claims of chronic whiplash injuries that arise in approximately 25% of all rear-end motor vehicle accidents.  Specifically, the researchers found evidence of fatty deposits that accumulated in persons who went on to suffer chronic whiplash injuries in fat and water MRI scans taken within one to two weeks after the initial injury.  Specifically, the MRI scans demonstrated “large amounts of fat infiltrating the patients’ neck muscles, indicating rapid atrophy.”  Lead Investigator James Elliott stated that “we believe this represents an injury that is more severe than what might be expected from a typical low-speed car crash.” 

The significance of the findings, if replicated, could be great for personal injury claims involving allegations of chronic whiplash injuries.  If the water-fat ratio in neck muscles becomes an accepted objective test of whiplash injury chronicity, it could take the guesswork out of these claims.  This of course seems like it would be a boon to plaintiffs’ claims; however, the defense would benefit also because it would limit chronic whiplash injury claims to those with objective evidence of injury.  In short, it could potentially provide definitive evidence of which claims are legitimate and which claims are not.  A residual beneficial effect for both sides would be more effective treatment.  As Elliott notes, chronic whiplash patients “may require a more concerted effort for pain management from their physician and help from a psychologist.”  Better treatment started sooner would be good for everyone involved in whiplash claims.

Lately it seems like we are stuck in a feedback loop:  yet another study has found a common treatment modality for acute low back pain to be much less effective than assumed.  In this case, medical researchers found that low dose oral corticosteroids (i.e. prednisone) did not improve pain and offered only modest functional improvement among patients suffering from acute sciatica due to a herniated lumbar disk.   According to lead author Harley Goldberg, DO, a spine care specialist at Kaiser Permanente's San Jose Medical Center, "[t]hese findings suggest that a short course of oral steroids (prednisone) is unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with sciatica due to a herniated disk in the lower back.”   Researchers also found that “oral steroids did not reduce the likelihood of undergoing surgery in the year following steroid treatment.”  Given the apparently modest benefits of oral steroid treatment for acute sciatica and the known deleterious effects of negative treatment history, it would seem prudent for researchers to verify the results of the study as soon as possible.  Otherwise we will all be stuck paying for treatment that doesn’t work and could possibly render later treatment modalities less effective.

Cogito ergo sum.  These words of Descartes are more commonly known to English speakers as “I think therefore I am.”  But what have they to do with medical treatment or medico-legal claims?  Quite a bit actually.  Descartes is famous among philosophers (a relative sort of fame) for arguing that the mind and the body are distinct entities.  We see evidence of this intellectual approach in our distinction between the biological and the psychological.  Take brain injuries as an example.  We distinguish between what we consider to be organic, neurological injuries from the psychological effects of injury.  Hence the distinction between post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.  The belief in dualism is extended into the legal realm also, where we have higher standards for proving mental only worker’s compensation injuries than mental injuries in worker’s compensation that arise out of a physical trauma.  But is our insistence on this dualism, that mind and body are separate entities, valid?

Much research suggests that our conception of mind and body as separate entities is not so clear cut as we would like to believe.  A good example of why we should be wary of separating the psychological from the physical involves the placebo effect.  Another example involves treatment history.  A group of researchers from German universities and Oxford University authored a 2014 study in which they found that treatment history experience has an astonishingly large effect on subsequent treatment, even when the type of treatment changed.  In their study they gave patients analgesic medication delivered through a patch and then later switched to a different analgesic medication delivered through a topical cream.  They found that those who responded positively to the first treatment also responded positively to the second treatment.  More significantly, the authors found that those who responded negatively to the first treatment also responded negatively to the second treatment despite being given a different medication with a different delivery mechanism. 

The findings are significant because the study “results may … challenge step care approaches in which treatment failure has to precede the prescription of next-in-line interventions.”  The treatment carryover effect could have a big impact on problematic claims where acute injuries become chronic condition and nothing seems to help.  As the authors note, “treatment experiences are ubiquitous in clinical care, particularly in patients suffering from chronic diseases.  Carry-over effects might therefore be particularly relevant in chronic conditions where treatments often fail repetitively and negative treatment experiences accumulate along the course of the disease.”  The authors suggest that targeted therapy, whether explicit psychological counseling or more implicit methods, could be used to address and attempt to overcome negative treatment history. 

The study demonstrates that our minds and bodies are not as separate as we sometimes like to think they are.  This can be frustrating when administering medico-legal claims because we want concrete answers.  We want diagnostic images to have a one-to-one correlation with physical complaints.  We want to know that if someone is prescribed a medicine, that it will work.  Unfortunately, medical science tells us that the healing and treatment process is more complicated.  While the treatment history study demonstrates the unpredictability of the healing process, it does offer learning opportunities.  At a minimum, if we see a failed treatment history we then know that the likelihood of the next intervention working is diminished.  In addition, knowing the effects of treatment history can provide a reason to have claimants undergo independent medical examinations.  Once a pattern of failed treatment history develops, an independent medical examination may be worthwhile to attempt to halt the seemingly endless spiral of failed treatments. 

The business of sorting out what is organic or biological from what is psychological is messy and probably futile.  Perhaps it is time that we put Descartes to rest and start thinking of the mind and body as inextricably linked, so inextricably linked that they are not in effect different.  Ego sum.  That’s it.  In the claims experience, this should help us deal with and understand the myriad responses to similar injuries that different claimants have.  

Chronic pain devastates sufferers and those close to them.  When it arises in the context of a worker’s compensation or personal injury claim, chronic pain complicates claims management and invariably increases costs, making a satisfactory resolution to all parties difficult to achieve.  The most heartbreaking context in which chronic pain arises is, however, military veterans injured in combat.  Unfortunately, veterans returning from Iraq or Afghanistan suffer higher rates of chronic pain than veterans of any other U.S. Military conflict.  The good news is that the VA is aggressively researching the problem and recently made some headway (that could alter the standard treatment protocol for all chronic pain sufferers, regardless of etiology).

VA researchers published the results from the ESCAPE trial (which stands for “Evaluation of Stepped Care for Chronic Pain”) in which they found that a specialized stepped care program resulted in participants reporting a “decrease in pain severity and 30 percent improvement in pain-related disability.”  The results are significant because “we know that medications alone are only modestly successful in helping [chronic pain sufferers]” and that “current pain treatments haven’t made much of a dent,” according to Dr. Matthew Bair, who led the study.

The stepped program involved an initial 12 weeks of treatment with analgesic medication and self-management using such strategies as relaxation techniques.  The second step involved 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy.  The second step helped participants “counter maladaptive thought” and to learn what activities they could substitute for pre-deployment activities to decrease pain and remain physically active.  This second phase would seem critical in the claims context where the greatest challenge is often simply overcoming the disability mindset, or turning the ingrained and almost pathological attitude of “I can’t” to “I can.”  In many cases, the issue is not that the chronic pain sufferer cannot perform an activity so much as it is that they convince themselves that they cannot before even attempting the activity.  The exciting thing about the study results and using targeted cognitive behavioral therapy in general is that it can help reorient the way chronic pain sufferers view activity in general.  Just because an injured worker can no longer train for and participate in marathons due to chronic low back pain does not mean that she cannot complete an 8-hour day as a delivery driver.  If cognitive behavioral therapy can help chronic pain sufferers to start looking at the world from the psychological perspective of “I can,” it would seem to go a long way toward improving both the lives of chronic pain sufferers and the outcomes of chronic pain claims.

The ESCAPE study is an exciting development in managing chronic pain patients.  Given the difficulty of managing chronic pain claims and the explosion in prescription opioid drug abuse related to treatment of chronic pain, it will be worth following the ESCAPE study to see if its results can be replicated.  Even a 30 percent reduction in disability level would likely be significant in a chronic pain claim and could easily represent the difference between partial impairment (and a return to work) and total disability.

Perhaps the most difficult challenge in orthopedics is articular cartilage.  You know, the white, pearlescent stuff that covers our joints and makes them operate smoothly and without pain (before arthritis sets in, that is).  And why is articular cartilage so difficult?  Well, it’s pretty simple:  we can’t regrow it when it breaks down and wears away.  Hence, the only options for treating worn articular cartilage or osteoarthritis are, once the pain and dysfunction become unbearable, to fuse the worn joint or to replace it with artificial components.  Despite advances in orthopedic components and surgical techniques, joint replacement is a suboptimal option for treating worn articular cartilage.  Fusion is even less optimal, the point of joints being articulation (or motion).

If we could figure out a way to regrow articular cartilage, calling it game-changing would be an understatement.  It would be revolutionary, especially for those in the worker’s compensation world where countless musculoskeletal injury claims involve allegations that work injuries or occupational exposure caused or worsened osteoarthritis.  Can you imagine a world where a claimant with debilitating knee pain goes to the doctor and rather than walking out with a knee replacement, the claimant goes to a gene therapist who treats the knee by growing new articular cartilage?  No surgery, no infection, no rehab, no disability, just a new knee. 

Turns out this dream is closer to reality than you might think.  Researchers in Manchester, England recently published research in which they used embryonic stem cells to regrow articular cartilage in the damaged knee joints of rats.  Remarkably, "[a]fter 12 weeks, the cartilage surface was smooth and similar in appearance to normal cartilage.”  In contrast to earlier efforts which produced abnormal and disorganized tissue, including tumors, the Manchester scientists were able to grow wholly normal, functioning cartilage in the rats’ knee joints.

These findings from the Manchester study are exciting (almost beyond exciting, truth be told).  The research is worth monitoring as it advances toward testing in human subjects, which is still probably several years away.  Nevertheless, this development gives us a glimpse of a potentially arthritis-free future.  Imagine that.

What is it about shoulders?  They seem to cause an inordinate amount of problems, especially when the rotator cuff is involved.  And invariably, there is a question as to whether a shoulder claim involves an acute injury, an acute aggravation of a preexisting condition, an occupational injury, or the mere manifestation of a preexisting condition.  One of the biggest challenges in claims is determining whether and to what extent a shoulder condition is work-related.  Unfortunately, this task is often difficult for physicians too.

The hallmark of an acute rotator cuff injury is an asymptomatic shoulder, a discernible traumatic event, and immediate pain and weakness.  Unfortunately, this type of presentation accounts for less than 10% of all rotator cuff tears according to some literature.  In addition, the medical literature suggests that acute rotator cuff tears are underdiagnosed in emergency departments and often attributed to tendonitis, bursitis, arthritis, or some combination of all three.  To further complicate matters, many other conditions of the shoulder, cervical spine, and peripheral nerve system can produce symptoms that are similar to symptoms occurring in rotator cuff tears.  And finally, a somewhat sizable percentage of the population has asymptomatic rotator cuff tears which makes the determination of the etiology of the cuff defect difficult to determine.

The best way to assess whether a rotator cuff tear is acute or traumatic is with diagnostic imaging.  Numerous studies have found that mid-substance tears are more likely to be acute than insertional tears.  The presence of swelling and joint fluid or a hematoma also suggest that a tear is acute.  To the contrary, the absence of joint and bursal fluid suggests a chronic tear.  The presence of fatty infiltration and the degree of rotator cuff atrophy are also useful findings to assess the chronicity of the tear.  Interestingly, at least one study found that the “injury mechanism and the activity at the moment of injury did not correlate with the presence of a rotator cuff lesion,” but also found “a strong age correlation, with a prevalence of RCTs above 50% in patients aged over 50 years…” This study suggests a shockingly high rate of rotator cuff injury resulting from shoulder trauma in persons over 50. 

The strong correlation between age and rotator cuff tear caused one study’s authors to postulate that “it is even likely that there [is] no such thing as an acute cuff tear without some previous tendon degeneration.”  The authors of another study address the complicated relationship between the chronicity and symptomatic nature of rotator cuff tears and note that the “duration of symptoms does not necessarily reflect the duration a patient has had a rotator cuff tear…  It is not understood why full-thickness tears become symptomatic in some individuals and not others.”  How then, can any physician determine to a reasonable degree of medical certainty if a particular rotator cuff tear relates to the patient’s employment in the absence of diagnostic imaging that suggests a tear is acute?

In truth, the answer is that any physician who attributes a symptomatic rotator cuff tear to a workplace injury is most likely engaging in speculation if there is no acute traumatic event and no diagnostic imaging evidence demonstrating that the tear is acute.  This doesn’t mean that the tear can’t be acute and work-related, simply that there is no reasonable basis for a physician to determine the exact etiology of the tear to a reasonable degree of medical certainty.  In handling claims, it is important to recognize these situations and pose the question to the IME doctor directly as to there is any way, given the current state of evidence-based medicine, to determine what caused a rotator cuff tear (or caused it to become symptomatic) to a reasonable degree of medical certainty in the absence of an acute traumatic event, diagnostic imaging evidence that a tear is acute, or occupational risk factors such as repetitive overhead work.  If there are no specific risk factors, no precipitating injury, and no diagnostic imaging evidence of an acute tear, the answer should always be “no.”

From a claims perspective, there are several useful things that can be gleaned from the medical literature addressing rotator cuff conditions.  First, a definitive assessment of causation in the absence of a discrete, acute precipitating event with imaging evidence demonstrating the presence of an acute tear or an occupational risk factor should be considered impossible.  Of course treating surgeons will attempt to relate rotator cuff conditions to workplace injuries that do not meet the above criteria, but it is incumbent from a claims perspective that the IME physician points to the relevant medical literature and explains why it is not possible, to a reasonable degree of medical certainty, to determine the etiology of a rotator cuff tear in the absence of the above criteria. 

Second, it should not come as a surprise if an employee over 40 who says they hurt their shoulder and is told that it is just a strain or tendinitis when they go the ER later discovers she has a rotator cuff tear.  The medical literature suggests that clinical examination in the emergency setting underestimate the presence of rotator cuff tears.  The relevant study found that in the patient population complaining of an acute shoulder injury who have an inability to perform active abduction above 90° and normal radiographs, more than 50% will have rotator cuff tears.  In establishing reserves, if the medical records show normal radiographs coupled with an inability to actively abduct the shoulder above 90°, it may be wise to consider the likelihood of a rotator cuff tear requiring surgical intervention to be 50%. 

Finally, knowing the different shoulder, neck, and peripheral nerve conditions that have similar symptom constellations to rotator cuff tear will help to assess what the likely diagnosis will be based on the clinical history, examination, and positive findings.  Thus, a shoulder complaint that can be localized to the acromioclavicular joint, is more likely to be a shoulder separation or acromioclavicular arthritis than a rotator cuff tear.  In another example, a complaint of gradual onset of shoulder pain with weakness that is especially noticeable during sleeping hours is likely to be a chronic rotator cuff tear or advanced impingement syndrome than an acute rotator cuff injury.

The bottom line is that shoulder injuries are often difficult claims, especially when they involve rotator cuffs.  Knowing the medical literature about how rotator cuff tears occur and what suggests acute versus chronic tears can help guide the claims analysis.  To learn more about the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of rotator cuff tears, join us on February 26, 2015 for the Medical Systems Advanced Medical Topics in Worker’s Compensation in Brookfield, Wisconsin at which Dr. Bartlett will give an in-depth presentation on acute shoulder injuries.  Claim handlers and legal professionals alike will gain valuable information on what claims will likely be compensable and what medical information can be used to defend against those which should not be compensable.

The employee is a delivery driver and is in a rollover accident.  Miraculously she suffers only minor injuries in the crash.  However, she hits the inside part of her right leg near her knee in the rollover and now, 18 months after the rollover, she still can’t go back to regular duty because she has a permanent foot drop.  Another employee gets his hand stuck in the machine he works on.  The broken bones heal and the tendons are repaired.  Unfortunately, it has been difficult returning him to work because he complains of burning pain every time he touches anything with the injured hand and his doctor has permanently restricted him to one-handed work.

What do these claims have in common?  Peripheral nerve injuries.  Peripheral nerve injuries are complicated, slow-healing, and often result in permanency.  Why are they so complicated and what you can do to make peripheral nerve injury claims go as smoothly as possible?  In this short primer, we hope to answer some of these questions.

To understand why nerve injuries are so challenging, it helps to know some basic nerve physiology.  Nerve cells (neurons) are essentially made up of little factories (axons) that produce chemicals (neurotransmitters) which mediate the electrical signals each nerve cell sends (axon) and receives (dendrite).  Nerve cells are not physically connected to each other and must send the electrical signals across a gap (synapse) to the next nerve cell (dendrite).  The axon of each nerve cell is encased in fatty cells (myelin) that increase the rate at which electrical signals are transmitted between nerve cells.  Branching extensions of the nerve cells (dendrites) receive the electrical signal from the axon of an adjacent nerve cell and transmit the signal to the axon for further transmission.  A failure of any part of this process will disrupt the nerve cell’s functioning and cause sensory or motor problems or both.

Unfortunately, nerve injuries take a long time to heal and often heal poorly because of the complex, compound, and disconnected nature of nerve cells.  Nerve injuries are categorized according to the degree to which the nerve cells are compromised. There are two classification systems – one use three categories and one using six categories.  This post will use the simpler, three part system because it is more concise (the six part system breaks second degree injuries into four subcategories based on the seriousness of the injury).  In first degree injuries, or neurapraxia, the nerve remains intact but its signaling ability is damaged.    Ordinarily persons suffering first degree injuries recover completely without residual sensory or motor impairment.  In second degree injuries, or axonotmesis, the axon is damaged but the surrounding connective tissues remain intact.  Recovery takes longer than in first degree injuries, but complete recovery without residual sensory or motor impairment is still the general rule.  In third degree injuries, or neurotmesis, both the axon and the surrounding connective tissue are damaged.  Recovery is exceptionally long in third degree injuries and typically results in some residual sensory or motor impairment.  In addition, surgery is often necessary to restore function in third degree injuries.  The alternate classification system essentially divides the axonotmesis category into four parts based on the severity of the insult to the axon. 

We will focus on third degree injuries because they are the most difficult to treat and usually result in permanency.  In a third degree nerve injury both the axon and supporting connective tissue are injured.  This means that the nerve cell must regenerate both the axon and its supporting structure.  The regeneration is complicated by a post-injury process called Wallerian degeneration.  Approximately 24-36 hours after the initial injury, the axonal injury disintegrates, the myelin sheath degrades, and macrophages and Schwann cells remove the cellular debris from the injury.  In third degree injuries, the supporting connective tissue (endoneurium), which is a tubular structure containing individual axonal fibers, is severed.  This causes problems because regenerating axonal fibers may meander into surrounding tissue or inappropriate neural tubes, thus failing to reinnervate their proper end organs.  The resulting loss of function is analogous to what would happen in a marionette show if the strings to the marionette controllers are cut and then randomly reattached, sometimes to the correct controller, sometimes to the incorrect controller.  Nothing really works right.

When nerve cells start regenerating after Wallerian degeneration, the process is slow.  Within four days of the injury, the injured axons start sending sprouts toward the neurolemma (tube comprised of Schwann cells surrounding the axon).  Schwann cells produce growth factors that attract the sprouts.  If a sprout reaches a neurolemma, it grows into the tube and advances approximately 1 mm per day until it reaches and reinnervates the target tissue.  Surgery may be necessary to guide the sprouts into the neurolemma when the gap is too wide or scar tissue has formed.  This regeneration and repair phase can last many months.  Human peripheral neurons are capable of initiating a regenerative response for at least 12 months after an injury.  Hence, it can be well after a year from the date of injury before a treating physician or an IME doctor will be able to place a patient who sustained a peripheral nerve injury at maximum medical improvement.

Further complicating matters, third degree injuries do not usually heal completely.  Several factors can contribute to an incomplete recovery.  First, intramuscular fibrosis (scarring) may hinder the muscle contraction a nerve impulse produces.  Erroneous cross-reinnervation may result in impaired functioning (the marionettes with crossed strings).  The imperfect regeneration also results in sensory deficits, especially in proprioception (how the body perceives itself in space), that rarely go away completely.  Even in first and second degree nerve injuries, sensory recovery often takes 6-12 months, so determining whether and to what degree permanent sensory impairment has resulted can take a year or more post-injury. 

The site of the injury itself and the regeneration process can result in the development of neuromas or gliomas, which can increase pain and disability.  If surgical realignment or stump approximation does not occur, the migration of axoplasm may form a neuroma, which is an errant scaffolding (structure) for axonal migration.  Essentially, the strands of axonal fibers get tangled as they seek the distal nerve stump, forming a ball of connective tissue and axonal fibers.  While some neuromas cause no problems, many are painful and impair functioning. 

Treatment and rehabilitation following peripheral nerve injury present their own challenges.  For example, in nerve injuries with extensive damage a graft may be needed to connect the two ends of viable nerve.  Using a graft will leave the patient with a large area of numbness that the donor nerve previously innervated.  The size of this area of numbness will shrink over time, but will not go completely away resulting in residual permanency for loss of sensation at a site remote from the injury.  In addition, nerve regeneration itself can be uncomfortable and accompanied by paresthesia (pins and needles) as the target tissue is reinnervated. 

Some of the direct consequences of peripheral nerve injury included:

  • Pain (ranging from tingling to intense, burning pain)
  • Numbness and altered sensation
  • Muscle weakness
  • Loss of function
  • Loss of active motion
  • Joint stiffness
  • Emotional distress

Unfortunately neuropathic pain is not well-understood and is difficult to treat.  Anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants are the most popular drugs for neuropathic pain.  “Complete relief is very difficult and only 40-60% of patients achieve partial relief.”  The persistence and refractory nature of neuropathic pain causes psychological distress and is difficult to understand for persons who are accustomed to the way more typical musculoskeletal pain responds to conventional analgesic medications.  From a claims standpoint, neuropathic pain presents great impediments to returning claimants to work because claimants are conditioned to equate pain with physical disability and loss of function, but neuropathic pain frequently does not impair function and is only disabling from a psychological perspective (not to diminish the psychological distress that neuropathic pain causes).  It is critical for return to work efforts that the treating physicians and occupational/physical therapists convey the distinction between neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain to the claimant to avoid protracted disability beyond the period of actual physical impairment caused by the injury.

Weakness and loss of function are common complications of third degree nerve injuries because even in the best case scenario nerve regeneration is imperfect.  As noted above, weakness and loss of function result from many complicating factors including slow regrowth causing irreparable muscle atrophy, imperfect regrowth resulting in loss of function, and the presence of scar tissue in the muscle preventing normal contracture.  This presents challenges to the claim handler who must attempt to gauge return to work, appropriate rehabilitation, and permanent partial disability.  EMG can determine the rate at which nerves are growing and muscles are reinnervating, but functional use/restoration will lag behind reinnervation.  The reinnervated muscles have been without innervation for a time, so the body must relearn how to use the muscles again which takes time.  In addition, the muscles are usually reinnervated imperfectly, so the body is not only relearning how to use the newly innervated muscles, but it is also learning a new neural pattern of action.  The body cannot rely on muscle memory to speed the relearning process because the newly configured reinnervation is different than it was before, meaning muscle memory itself is altered or lost. 

Some studies have found that conservative therapies can be used alone or in conjunction with surgery to help restore function in peripheral nerve injuries.  Laser phototherapy “maintains functional activity of the injured nerve for a long period, decreases scar tissue formation at the injury site, decreases degeneration in corresponding motor neurons of the spinal cord and significantly increases axonal growth and myelinization.”  In addition, acupuncture has been found to be an effective treatment modality in improving the rate of recovery.  In managing nerve injury claims, it is important to know what therapies work and what do not.  Effective claim handlers should be conversant in treatment modalities that can hasten recovery and improve ultimate function so they can ensure patients with peripheral nerve injuries receive the treatment that will get them to an end of healing the fastest and will minimize the inevitable permanent partial disability rating.

Even with effective conservative treatment modalities such as laser phototherapy or acupuncture, recovering function and building strength in peripheral nerve injuries are long and arduous processes that require skilled therapy and a motivated patient.  If either variable is lacking, recovery is likely to be compromised.  A supreme difficulty for claim handlers is managing the nerve injury case where either the employee lacks motivation or their choice of treating therapist appears to be wanting in some fashion.  Early engagement in the claim can help foster a “can do” attitude in the injured worker and a positive relationship with the therapist so that he or she pushes the worker and provides the highest and best evidence-supported rehabilitative care.

The Medical Systems, Inc. “Advanced Topics in Worker’s Compensation Symposium” will address these and other issues related to severe, acute industrial injuries to the hand and wrist with Dr. Jan Bax.  Join us to learn why severe hand and wrist injuries present such difficult challenges, what the best medical and surgical treatments of these injuries are, and what strategies you can utilize to help claimants get the best physical recovery and (in the process) lower your costs. 

Headaches are such a headache.  This will hardly be news to anyone working in claims or human resources.  Whether the headaches are wholly personal (FMLA), work-related, or accident-related, employees and claimants with permanent and persistent headaches pose a unique challenge.  A new study reported on in Medical News Today suggests that instead of taking a conservative approach to managing headaches, which is the most effective and lowest cost treatment modality, many medical providers are instead opting to order expensive and typically useless advanced neuroimaging tests for their headache patients.  The study specifically found that, “rather than talking to patients about the causes and potential sources of relief from headache pain, clinicians are increasingly ordering advanced imaging and providing specialist referrals, both of which are considered to be of little value in the treatment of routine headaches.” 

Generally speaking, conservative treatment such as stress-relief counseling and avoiding dietary triggers are the preferred treatment modalities for managing most routine headaches.  As John N. Mafi, M.D., lead author of the study, notes, “the assessment of headaches depends on identifying the relatively rare instances where serious underlying causes are suspected” and that “despite the publication of numerous practice guidelines, clinicians are increasingly ordering advanced imaging and referring to specialists while less frequently suggesting first-line lifestyle modifications to their patients.

The problem with the overusing imaging studies rather than treating conservatively is multifold.  First, and most obviously, ordering unnecessary imaging studies unnecessarily increases costs.  Second, overusing imaging studies may result in incidental findings that “provoke unnecessary patient anxiety, can lead to more invasive procedures and often require follow-up testing," as Dr. Mafi stated, further increasing costs unnecessarily.  Third, ordering unnecessary imaging may in fact delay recovery from acute episodes and hamper control over chronic headaches because most patients are not being offered the most effective treatment for most headaches.  This invariably will lead to greater absenteeism and greater levels of perceived disability.

The truth is, by and large most headaches do not require any type of neuroimaging or laboratory testing.  For example, “in the absence of neurologic findings, episodic migraine does not require imaging studies…”  Also, “[p]atients who have had a stable headache pattern for at least six months rarely have significant intracranial pathology” and “in the absence of worrisome features, these patients do not require imaging.”  One reason that imaging studies are usually not required for headache is that “[i]n adults, it is unusual for headache to be the presenting symptom of an underlying systemic disease in the absence of other symptoms.”  This is why additional testing, including neuroimaging, is not recommended in the absence of red flag signs and symptoms that suggest an underlying dangerous pathology might be causing the headache.  According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, red flag signs and symptoms in the evaluation of acute headaches that require additional testing (and the testing recommended) include:

  • First or worst headache of the patient’s life – neuroimaging
  • Focal neurologic signs, not typical aura – blood tests, neuroimaging
  • Headache triggered by cough or exertion, or while engaged in sexual intercourse – lumbar puncture, neuroimaging
  • Headache with change in personality, mental status, level of consciousness – blood tests, lumbar puncture, neuroimaging
  • Neck stiffness – lumbar puncture (meningitis)
  • Older than 50 years – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, neuroimaging
  • Papilledema (optical disc swelling) – lumbar puncture, neuroimaging
  • Rapid onset (seconds to minutes, thunderclap headache) – lumbar puncture, neuroimaging
  • Systemic illness with headache – blood test, lumbar puncture, neuroimaging, skin biopsy if rash present
  • Tenderness over temporal artery – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, temporal artery biopsy
  • Worsening pattern – neuroimaging.

Fortunately, headache management is surprisingly simple and requires little “medicine” in the conventional sense.  Perhaps this is part of the problem:  patients expect high tech, advanced imaging to “figure out what is wrong” with them when high tech, advanced imaging will do no such thing for the vast majority of headache patients.  Instead, the more pedestrian truth is that physicians do not know why most patients with chronic or episodic headaches have them and that the most effective management techniques often involve lifestyle choices to reduce stress and avoid headache triggers: 

Behaviors that help to prevent headache flares include establishing a habit of regular mealtimes, sleep and awake times, and exercise.  It is useful to help the patient identify any connection between psychosocial stressors and headache flares.  Most headache patients can benefit from basic stress-reduction techniques such as yoga and meditation.  There is compelling evidence for the efficacy of biofeedback, relaxation techniques, and cognitive-behavior therapy for headache prophylaxis. 

Headaches are not all that difficult to treat.  The results of the above study are disappointing because advanced imaging studies (and other diagnostic tests) are contraindicated in the vast majority of patients with episodic and chronic headaches.  Episodic and chronic headache are difficult because the etiology is usually unknown and the treatment is dispiritingly low tech for a patient population accustomed to seeing fancy drug ads and hearing about exciting technological breakthroughs on a regular basis.  The key to treatment is for patients to accept responsibility for their condition and to take steps to manage the condition effectively.  From a claims or an employee management perspective, knowing the evidence-based treatment guidelines for episodic and chronic headache will help keep a handle on what treatment is being proposed and authorized and will help ensure that doctor and patient alike are following the guidelines.    

A recent development finds an alternative to postoperative pain management in knee replacement surgery that appears to offer more effective pain relief and potentially speedier recovery.  Researchers found that when they injected “a newer long-acting numbing medicine called liposomal bupivacaine into the tissue surrounding the knee during surgery…[p]atients had pain relief for up to two days after surgery and better knee function compared with the traditional method."  One of the study’s authors noted that “many patients were able to walk comfortably within hours after surgery.”

It is estimated that more than half of American adults diagnosed with knee arthritis will have a knee replacement at some point.  Given the prevalence of knee replacement surgery both in the general patient and worker’s compensation patient populations, any development that can improve pain relief and increase early knee function could have a profound impact.  Prescription pain reliever abuse continues to vex society and intraoperative techniques that can reduce the need for postoperative narcotic pain relief can only help the problem.  In addition, faster restoration of knee function has the potential to speed rehabilitation and end of healing.  If this new technique fulfills its early promise, it could have a significant and positive effect on reducing costs and recovery time of knee replacements.  In the worker’s compensation setting, this would be a welcome development.

Andreas Goebel, a lecturer in molecular and clinical pharmacology at the University of Liverpool, has an article at The Conversation about an exciting development in the understanding of how chronic pain works, which offers possible insight into treating Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (“CRPS”), among other chronic pain conditions.  Historically, CRPS has been considered primarily a brain problem.  The article points out that recent research suggests autoantibodies are implicated in CRPS by “binding to peripheral tissues, prompting sensory nerves to misfire.”  The working theory is that trauma, even minor trauma, induces inflammation which causes the binding/misfiring sequence and this in turn causes the central nervous system to become “wound up.”  Once the central nervous system is wound up, it malfunctions, causing the unusual and often intractable symptoms of CRPS.  As Goebel reports, the discovery of autoantibodies’ role in pain development is important because “there are treatment methods … designed to reduce or remove antibodies,” which may well prove effective in treating CRPS, especially if treatment is initiated early in the progression of the disease.  These findings could prove important as claims involving CRPS typically have high disability and medical expenses and are difficult to process and close in a timely manner.  Any effective treatment options would have the potential to change CRPS claims processing radically for the better.

Chronic and terminal pain cause myriad personal, interpersonal, and socioeconomic problems.  In what can only be described as sadly ironic, the most effective pain relievers currently available, all of which are opioids, have side effects that can cause problems that are as bad as the pain the drugs are administered to control.  The most troublesome and well-known side effects include altered mentation/sedation, physical dependence, respiratory depression, constipation, and androgen deficiency.  For example, cancer pain can be managed effectively with powerful opioids, but at the expense of rendering the person suffering from the pain nearly comatose.  In non-terminal, chronic pain patients, physical dependency can lead to job loss and ultimately death by respiratory failure from overdose.

Our current ability to manage chronic and terminal pain puts many sufferers in a catch 22:  treat the pain but get the side effects, avoid the side effects but live with the pain.  The ideal solution to the chronic and terminal pain conundrum would be to develop or discover methods to control pain that are as effective as opioids but without the systemic side effects.  In short, new pain relief treatments should only target that which is generating the pain.  Fortunately, a group from Flinders Medical Centre in South Australia is doing just that.  Medical News Today reports that lead researcher, Associate Professor Nick Spencer, and his team have developed a technique to identify precisely which nerve endings detect painful stimuli.  They then developed a method to inject a harmless virus into the site from which the pain originates that travels to the spinal cord and shuts off a channel to the affected nerve endings that is essential for pain perception.  As Spencer noted, “shutting off the pain is not instant, it can take days to weeks, but the big advantage is that pain can be suppressed for long periods without the classic side effects of current pain therapies.” 

The team’s current research focused on incurable pain located in the stomach and intestines, but Spencer believes the technique will have broader applications.  This would be exciting news for everyone and would be especially welcome in the claim handling community as chronic pain cases are often vexing, expensive, and resource intensive.  Any development that could eliminate or at least reduce the use of opioid pain medications in the chronic pain context would have a significant and positive effect on the management of claims involving chronic pain.  

Medical News Today reports on an interesting development in treatment of noise-induced hearing loss.  Researchers from the University of Michigan and Harvard Medical School used gene therapy to reverse partial hearing loss in mice.  The mice’s genes were manipulated to increase production of a protein (NT3) necessary to keep the connection between the ear’s hair cells and the nerve cells that communicate with the brain “super-fast,” also called a “ribbon synapse.”  Exposure to noise and normal aging can damage the ribbon synapse, leading to hearing loss.  By increasing production of the protein NT3, researchers were able to repair damage to ribbon synapses and restore hearing.

This is exciting news for anyone handling worker’s compensation claims because hearing loss claims plague myriad employers.  Researchers noted that rather than pursuing gene therapy in human subjects, the most likely way to increase production of NT3 in humans would be through the use of drugs, a number of which researchers have already identified as candidates.  From a worker’s compensation perspective, the possibility of reversing hearing loss would represent a substantial development in what has previously been a permanent condition manageable only through the use of hearing aids.  However, the use of pharmaceuticals to treat hearing loss would have costs.  How substantial those would be is impossible to guess.  Regardless, it is worth monitoring the research to see if the same finding can be reproduced in human subjects.  

Cardiovascular disease kills almost 600,000 Americans annually.  It also has a huge impact the American economy, costing $444 billion annually in healthcare services, medications, and lost productivity.  Once cardiovascular disease sets in, management options can be limited and usually include long term medication management and often surgical intervention.  However, the easiest and most cost-effective way to manage cardiovascular disease is to prevent it from occurring in the first place.  We know that exercise, diet, and weight loss all help prevent cardiovascular disease.  What is becoming more well-known is the profound effect that being sedentary has on cardiovascular health, even in persons who regularly exercise, eat well, and maintain a healthy weight.  Being sedentary can precipitate cardiovascular disease and even counteract positive lifestyle changes that persons make in an effort to prevent cardiovascular disease. 

Recent research reported on in this site demonstrated that sitting for long periods of time has significant, deleterious health consequences.  Other research has found that simply standing for greater periods during the workday both counteracts the effects of sitting and has independent positive health effects.  Now researchers have found that walking just 5 minutes per hour at an easy pace can eliminate the negative effects of sitting.  In the study, reported in Medicine and Science in Sports & Exercise, participants sat for three hours without moving their legs.  On another occasion, the same participants sat for 3 hours but walked for 5 minutes at the 30, 90, and 150 minute marks.  In each session, researchers measured femoral artery function to gauge whether walking had any cardiovascular effects.  Astonishingly, “the researchers found that, while sitting, the dilation and expansion of the participants' arteries were impaired by up to 50% after just the first hour.”  Equally remarkable is the fact that no decline in arterial functioning was observed when the participants walked for 5 minutes every hour.  The findings are significant because, as one researcher stated,

"There is plenty of epidemiological evidence linking sitting time to various chronic diseases and linking breaking sitting time to beneficial cardiovascular effects, but there is very little experimental evidence. We have shown that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function, which is an early marker of cardiovascular disease, and that breaking sitting time prevents the decline in that function."

So what can employers and employee’s do?  Perhaps walking for 5 minutes every hour is not entirely feasible for every workplace, but certainly standing as much as possible during the day will help.  In addition, taking a short walk at least once an hour to get a drink of water (or something similar) and not immediately sitting afterwards would likely make a difference.  And if incorporating standing and moving during the day seems like a burden to employers, they should keep in mind that cardiovascular health improves brain health which in turn improves productivity.  In addition, employers should keep in mind the costs of being sedentary on cardiovascular health because, in our system of employer-provided healthcare, the employer bears most of them either directly or indirectly.  Figuring out how to get employees moving for 5 minutes and hour seems to be a small cost in comparison.

Pain is a difficult and an amorphous concept.  The most common understanding of pain is what we feel when our nociceptors are stimulated.  A nociceptor is a receptor on a sensory nerve that responds to damaging or potentially damaging stimuli and sends a signal to the brain that is interpreted as pain.  When a child falls down and is asked, “does it hurt?” they are referring to nociception.  One of the problems we encounter in relation to pain is that not everything that we might classify or categorize as “pain” is wholly or even partially related to nociception.  Grief, for example, can be painful but obviously does not implicate nociception, despite the fact that psychic pain can be described in somatic terms or be physically felt or manifested.

The problem with pain is that we have a medical model for addressing concerns related to the body that tends to subsume everything suboptimal as pathological.  One of the tenets of the medical model is that a certain level of physical function is optimal and that everything that is not optimal is somehow pathological and amenable to cure.  This idea ignores the reality of physical diversity and can turn normal human experience into a medical condition to be treated rather than a normal aspect of life to be lived through or with.  The physical changes that occur with aging are a good example of how we medicalize normal human development and attempt to “cure” that which is not pathological.  As a culture, we seem to have fallen into the trap of thinking that every medicalized problem has a cure, including the physical changes that occur with age.  Hence, we pathologize normal aspects of growing old as “chronic” pain and treat them as if a cure were possible. 

Human bodies have tissues that degrade over time; human bodies are also less resilient over time.  This is not to say that age-related physical changes do not vary widely in their effects based on individual experience or that lifestyle has no effect on the changes, but rather is an observation that human bodies do not function as well in the 6th decade of life as they do in the 3rd decade of life, all things being equal.  In short, we get old. 

Getting old is a fact over which we have some influence.  We can maintain a healthy weight, eat a diet rich in fiber and fruits and vegetables, maintain an active lifestyle, get adequate sleep, etc.  These things will help us to avoid accelerating the aging process within our tissues.  In addition, our genetic makeup plays a significant role in how our bodies’ age.  Unfortunately, the influence we have does not stop aging or the physical effects of aging.  No matter how healthy our weight or our diet or our lifestyle, collagen becomes less elastic, spinal discs desiccate, articular cartilage wears.  In the claims world we often feel the effects of medicalizing age because claimants will try to link the normal effects of aging with a worker’s compensation claim or a personal injury claim.  Unfortunately, the effects are often exceedingly expensive as such claimants seek seemingly unending treatment to cure the incurable:  age.  Both claimants and claims administrators would be better served if treating physicians identified age-related degenerative changes and gave patients options to help them cope with the changes better rather than promising panaceas (usually in the form of surgery) that do not help.

8/15/2014 in Blog Categories, News, Treatment

Pain.  Just writing it conjures up unpleasant memories of illness and injuries.  And whether we like it or not, we all experience pain.  In many cases, pain is present for a very good reason:  it is the body’s way to tell the brain to stop, that something bad happened or is about to happen.  Hence, it hurts when we touch a hot burner on the stove so we yank our hand back.  A sprained ankle hurts when we put weight on it so we stay off it (or at least limp).  Pain is, at least in part, a protective mechanism. 

Pain can also be debilitating.  When it is not nociceptive (i.e., when it is not caused by a pain-inducing stimulus as in the examples above), pain immobilizes us even though it often does not serve a protective function.  This frequently has deleterious consequences for our health.  We become sedentary.  We gain weight.  We become depressed.  We lose confidence. 

When it comes to pain, we typically are dealing with two related but different phenomena:  threshold and tolerance.  Threshold refers to the point at which a person feels pain.  Different persons have different pain thresholds.  Also, it appears that a person’s pain threshold appears not to change over time (though chronic narcotic usage can lower a person’s pain threshold).  Tolerance refers to how much pain a person can handle.  Common tolerance measurements would include things such as how much pain can a person tolerate before they seek medication, or how much pain can a person tolerate before they seek to remove the painful stimuli.

We know that pain which serves no nociceptive purpose often immobilizes us.  But what if there was a way to make the pain more tolerable, to increase our ability to handle the pain and be more active?  According to research (subscription required) reported on in the New York Times, there is something that can increase our tolerance of pain:  exercise.  Not a two billion dollar drug or expensive surgery, just good old-fashioned exercise.  In the study, one group of healthy but sedentary individuals was placed on an exercise plan while the control group of healthy but sedentary individuals was not.  The two groups were then subject to testing throughout the study that measured both pain threshold and tolerance.  As Gretchen Reynolds notes, “volunteers in the exercise group displayed substantially greater ability to withstand pain.”  Interestingly, the study found that the participants’ pain threshold did not change, only their tolerance did.  As Matthew Jones, one of the researchers stated, “to me…the participants who exercised had become more stoical and perhaps did not find the pain as threatening after exercising, even though it still hurts as much…”

This could have important implications in the worker’s compensation and personal injury settings.  Pain presents a particularly difficult conundrum in the medico-legal context because we are frequently dealing with persons who have (or allege) an injury overlaying a significant degenerative disease processes like osteoarthritis or degenerative disk disease that, to put it simply, hurts.  In an effort to improve functionality, it seems like the goal of treatment is often to eliminate or reduce pain, which has predictably poor results in the context of a chronic, degenerative condition like degenerative arthritis.  The Reynolds article and the study on which it is based suggest a different approach may be in order.  Rather than telling patients that pain is bad and needs to be eliminated, perhaps patients need to be told that pain isn’t so bad and that they can take it.  According to Mr. Jones, “the brain begins to accept that we are tougher than it had thought, and it allows us to continue longer although the pain itself has not lessened.” 

This validates the advice we frequently see from independent medical experts who frequently note that patients suffering from progressively deteriorating degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis need more activity not less and less treatment not more in order to maximize function and to learn how to live with the realities of a degenerative condition.  It will be a positive development if the study’s results can be replicated and exercise can become a standard, first line treatment for conditions causing chronic pain.  Instead of downward spirals into depression and dependence, perhaps we will see more patients take control and increase their independence and engagement.  This alone would have an enormously positive impact on worker’s compensation and personal injury claims.

Medical News Today reports on a study published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (subscription required) which found that patients whose opioid use was increasing prior to spine surgery had worse outcomes than those whose opioid use was not.  As Medical News Today notes, studies have shown that opioid use prior to spine surgery frequently leads to worse outcomes, but "the studies did not account for differences in opioid consumption among patients."  In this new study, the authors concluded that, "increased preoperative opioid use was a significant predictor of worse health outcomes at 3 and 12 months following surgical treatment..."  While this news is not particularly surprising to those in the medico-legal world, it does offer an opportunity to ask IME physicians a targeted question about the appropriateness of spine surgery in claimants with a demonstrated history of opioid dose escalation which should ensure that the physician's opinion explicitly relies on evidence-based medicine and hence is more credible.

Evidence continues to mount that arthroscopy to treat osteoarthritis of the knee is no better than sham surgery or conservative care.  The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) published a final report (executive summary available here) on May 12, 2014 that consisted of a meta-analysis of various studies comparing arthroscopy to various modalities, including sham surgery and strengthening exercises.  The report’s authors concluded that:

The benefit of therapeutic arthroscopy (with lavage and possible additional debridement) for the treatment of gonarthrosis is not proven. There was no hint, indication or proof of a benefit of therapeutic arthroscopy for any patient-relevant outcome in comparison with no active comparator intervention. There was also no hint, indication or proof of a benefit of therapeutic arthroscopy for any outcome in the comparisons with lavage, oral administration of NSAIDs, intraarticular hyaluronic acid injection or strengthening exercises under the supervision of a physical therapist.

While this information is not new, it bolsters the conclusion that arthroscopy to treat osteoarthritis of the knee is no more effective than other modalities, including conservative care and doing nothing.   The standard of care does appear to be shifting toward the abandonment of arthroscopy to treat osteoarthritis of the knee; however, the procedure is still performed occasionally.  In managing claims, it is important to ensure that approval for any arthroscopic knee procedure be based on evidence-based medicine.  Insurance carriers should not be expected to bear the cost of procedures the benefit of which “is not proven.”  In addition, injured plaintiffs and employees should not be expected to bear the risks of surgical complications and extended recovery periods for procedures the benefit of which “is not proven.”

Medical News Today reports on a recent finding from Johns Hopkins that most spine surgeons do not follow recommendations for presurgical screening for depression and anxiety.  This is significant because depression and anxiety are known to increase recovery times and reduce the likelihood of a successful outcome.  According to one researcher quoted in the Medical News Today article, 

"Our survey results show that surgeons and patients still have a long way to go in recognizing and appreciating how much psychological factors and mental health can impact the success of their back surgeries," says health services researcher and senior study investigator Richard Skolasky, Sc.D. "It may be necessary to delay surgery in order to first treat a patient's depression or anxiety to minimize the likelihood of prolonged recuperation after their operation.

Interestingly, the study found that surgeons in private practice and at community hospitals were more likely to provide presurgical screening than were surgeons affiliated with university hospitals.  In addition, surgeons with more than 15 years of practice and those performing 200+ spinal surgeries per year were more likely to provide screening.  

Considering the enormous expense of spine surgery, it would seem wise for claims handlers to exert whatever influence or control available to ensure that claimants receive proper presurgical psychological screening before undergoing recommended spine surgery.  This also seems to be an area in which the insurance industry (including group health carriers) could and should exert its influence to make presurgical psychological screening mandatory in spine surgery cases.

Patients often confuse positive findings on diagnostic imaging studies and what the findings mean for their personal health.  For example, many studies demonstrate that asymptomatic persons who undergo MRI scans of their shoulder, knee, neck, or back frequently demonstrate positive findings, especially in persons over 40.  In the case of a shoulder this may be in the form of shoulder impingement or rotator cuff pathology.  A knee scan may demonstrate a torn meniscus.  A neck or back scan may show a herniated disk.  The question for the healthcare market generally is whether positive findings in asymptomatic individuals lead to increased healthcare costs. 

Unfortunately but not surprisingly, much research finds that positive findings on diagnostic imaging scans of asymptomatic persons lead to increased medical interventions and costs.  This is particularly problematic in the context of back and neck pain.  According to the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, spine surgery rates are highest where spine imaging rates are highest.  www.jabfm.org/content/22/1/62.full.pdf.  As the authors note

One problem with inappropriate imaging is that it may result in findings that are irrelevant but alarming.  Positive findings, such as herniated disks, are common in asymptomatic people.  In a randomized trial there was a trend toward more surgery and higher costs among patients receiving early spinal MRI than those receiving plain films, but no better clinical outcomes.

Another study (subscription required) compared early MRI use versus no MRI use in low back pain patients and found significantly higher costs among those receiving early MRIs.  “The early-MRI groups had similar outcomes regardless of radiculopathy status: much lower rates of going off disability and, on average, $12,948 to $13,816 higher medical costs than the no-MRI groups.”  As a result of studies such as these that demonstrate increased interventions and costs following positive findings on diagnostic imaging, the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society “recommend against routine imaging in patients with nonspecific back pain …”   

In addition to the costs associated with a positive finding on MRI in an asymptomatic person, the actual cost of the MRI may itself be unnecessary.  A study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine (subscription required) compared the effectiveness of standard clinical examinations versus MRI scans for various conditions.  Remarkably, the clinical examination outperformed the MRI in diagnosing ACL pathology, meniscal pathology, and articular cartilage pathology (osteoarthritis).  With respect to diagnosing articular cartilage pathology, clinical assessment was 100% sensitive while MRI was only 33% sensitive.  This study seems to suggest that MRI would not even be necessary for knee pain without a correspondingly positive clinical finding. 

A large part of the problem may be due to a misunderstanding of pain and an overconfidence in the abilities of medicine to manage it.  Most people who suffer from chronic or recurrent pain assume that if a specific cause of the pain can be identified and once identified the specific cause can be ‘fixed,’ which will remove the pain.  Unfortunately, chronic or recurrent conditions often do not work this way.  For example, degenerative arthritis is not susceptible to easy fixes and requires a strategy of management and tolerance rather than futile and expensive searches for cures.  As the JABFM article points out, “there are no ‘magic bullets’ for chronic back pain, and expecting a cure from a drug, injection, or operation is generally wishful thinking.” 

The fact of life is that there are often no panaceas for age-, genetic-, or disease-related degenerative conditions.  “Patients need realistic expectations despite product marketing, media reports, and medical rhetoric that promise a pain-free life.”  It is hard to keep expectations realistic when being besieged by marketing, media reports, and medical rhetoric.  Our desire for efficiency, to find the fastest, easiest solution to any problem, further complicates the ability to maintain realistic expectations.  Not only are we inundated with messages that tell us the answer to our problem is easy, we are also biologically programmed to seek the easiest solution.  This is most unfortunate because with chronic conditions like joint pain or back pain, the most effective treatment is usually one that requires lifestyle changes, which indubitably is not the easiest solution.  Hence, losing weight, increasing activity, pursuing a targeted home exercise program, and psychologically conditioning oneself to deal with persistent pain will bring the most relief but is probably the last option most persons will want to pursue.

The medicolegal world often confronts the difficulty of imaging studies creating problems where none previously existed.  This can be devastating in the context of chronic pain because, as noted above, increased imaging tends to lead to increased surgical intervention.  And if the imaging study finds an asymptomatic lesion, operating on an asymptomatic lesion or condition will not fix the chronic pain.  It is important that we in the medicolegal world ask healthcare professionals to follow evidence-based standards for performing imaging studies in the context of musculoskeletal complaints.  If imaging studies are not indicated, they should not be performed for the simple reason that the likelihood of an asymptomatic lesion or pathology being discovered is substantial, which is likely to merely induce the patient to fixate on the lesion or pathology as causative of his or her problem.  This fixation often results in increased medical expenses, unnecessary interventions, and increased disability.  To the extent that medicolegal professionals can require treating physicians follow evidence-based treatment guidelines, they should.  One mechanism for doing this is through the IME.  To be most effective in this regard, it may be advisable to ask the IME physician a specific question related to what evidence-based treatment guidelines apply and should be followed.

Medical News Today has an article about exciting research from the United Kingdom regarding management of back pain.  The article notes that:

Stratified or targeted care of back pain implemented by family doctors leads to 'significant' improvements for patients and a 50% reduction in work absence - without an increase in healthcare costs...

To accomplish the targeted care, general practitioners participating in the study gave patients a 9 part questionnaire to evaluate the severity of their back problems.  Patients were then placed low risk, medium risk, and high risk categories, with treatment individualized based on the level of risk.  Importantly, the low risk patients were not given intensive treatment but were simply reassured about their back pain and given strategies for managing it.  Medium and high risk patients received "more intensive treatments led by [physical therapists]."

Prior research found that targeted treatment of back pain was effective, but this is the first evidence that targeted care is effective at the family practice level of care.  Medical News Today quotes Professor Alan Silman, medical director of Arthritis Research UK: 

This exciting research shows that stratified or targeted approach to managing back pain in primary care is effective, and challenges the 'one-size fits all' strategy that is currently recommended by national guidelines in which everyone with nonspecific back is offered the same treatment, irrespective of their risk of persistent problems.

Critically, the research found that the targeted approach to back pain does not increase costs.  Whether the results can be duplicated remains to be seen, but the study offers a promising method for early, cost-effective intervention in persons suffering from back pain.  The fact that the protocol resulted in a 50% reduction in workplace absence is remarkable and reason enough to attempt to replicate the findings so they can be implemented as standard care in general medical practices.  Professor Silman put it to Medical News Today best:

Back pain is one of the leading causes of work place absence, and to be able to reduce this burden on society by getting more people back to work, as well as giving benefit to individuals is a fantastic outcome. 

Researchers at the University Of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston, Rice University, and Shriners Hospital for Children-Houston recently published findings in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (subscription required) regarding use of antibiotic-containing microspheres that could lead to their use in joint replacement surgeries. Researchers found that antibiotic-containing microspheres could significantly reduce the rate of infection in joint replacement surgery:

Porous metal implants that were coated with the microspheres prevented infection in 100 percent of the 11 specimens. In the tissue and bone surrounding implants that were not coated with the antibiotic delivery system, infection occurred at a rate of 64 percent. (Emphasis added).

According to a press release announcing the findings, the infection rate in joint replacement surgery is between 1% and 3%. While this is a low figure, one million persons per year undergo hip and knee replacements alone. This means that between 10,000 and 30,000 patients develop an infection after joint replacement surgery. As anyone who has been involved with a claim in which a joint replacement became infected knows, the costs of infection can be staggering. Often the original prosthesis will have to be removed to treat the infection. Sometimes patients end up effectively undergoing three joint replacements because an antibiotic-impregnated temporary prosthesis is used to treat the infection, which will then be taken out when the infection is cleared and replaced with a second permanent prosthesis. The lead researcher, Catherine Ambrose, Ph.D., noted:

[m]ade of biodegradable polymers, the antibiotics are gradually released over a period of weeks and eventually the microspheres dissolve, allowing sufficient time to prevent or treat an infection while reducing the likelihood of additional surgeries.

Better preventing and controlling infections in joint replacement surgeries would greatly decrease both costs and human suffering.The use of microspheres is exciting for reasons other than simply reducing the rate of infection. When persons develop an infection after a joint replacement, they are typically given systemic antibiotics. Microspheres offer a significant advantage when it comes to side effects because they are administered directly at the surgical site. According Ambrose, "[t]he microspheres could be administered directly at the surgical site, eliminating the need for systemic antibiotics that impact the entire body." Systemic antibiotics are hard on the body. They often cause gastrointestinal problems (and in extreme cases can lead to the development of infection with clostridium difficile, or c diff). Systemic antibiotics can also cause fever, rash, and potentially more extreme, though rare, side effects.It will be interesting to follow the use of antibiotic-containing microspheres in joint replacement surgery. If they prove as effective in practice as they have in the preliminary, preclinical trial, they will eliminate much suffering while reducing costs and improving outcomes in joint replacement surgeries.

Researchers recently discovered that persons suffering from lumbago (low back pain) alter their movements because they fear possible back pain.  Researchers believe that this behavior can contribute to acute low back pain becoming chronic.  Essentially, "[t]hey are trapped within a vicious circle: fearing the suffering linked to movement, they lose their mobility, and the pain persists."  Most interesting was the fact that patients in the study felt less pain when researchers told them they were going to feel less pain even when the pain stimulus being applied was higher.  As the author of the article points out, "it seems that the first pain-reliever to be administered to a patient suffering from acute lumbago should be a generous dose of reassuring words, in order to prevent the illness from becoming chronic."This is potentially an important development for the medico-legal world because the costs of surgical intervention on worker's compensation and personal injury claims are staggering and any method for helping patients manage acute low back pain to prevent it from becoming chronic would represent a huge cost savings.

12/21/2012 in Treatment
In today’s competitive climate of rising costs and shrinking profit margins, an increasing number of businesses are looking for ways to ensure a healthy bottom line. The rising cost of Worker’s Compensation claims, as well as the direct and indirect cost of job-related injuries, is being closely scrutinized.One way to control costs is to develop a comprehensive approach to reducing and treating injuries, and an effective method for treating injured workers is the use of professional physical therapy services.PHYSICAL THERAPY IS A DISTINCT PROFESSIONThe physical therapy profession is a distinct entity within the allied health professions. The physical therapist is a licensed trained professional who plans and administers a physical therapy plan of care for medically referred patients in need of physical therapy services.USED TO TREAT MOVEMENT DYSFUNCTIONThe role physical therapy plays in workers’ rehabilitation is primarily in the assessment and management of movement dysfunction. Physical therapists work to restore the functional abilities of individuals who are either permanently or temporarily disabled due to illness, disease, trauma, or congenital abnormalities. In addition to their role as clinicians, physical therapists may serve as educators, consultants, and researchers.MAJOR OBJECTIVESThe major objectives of physical therapy are:• Prevention and relief of disability and pain;• Preservation or restoration of maximal functional capabilities;• Promotion of healing; and• Adaptation to temporary or permanent disability.EXERCISE AND PHYSICAL AGENTS USEDThe field of physical therapy typically uses exercise and physical agents such as heat, light, water, and massage to relieve pain caused by surgery or by chronic medical conditions, improve muscle strength and mobility, and improve basic functions (standing, walking, and grasping) in patients recovering from debilitating illness or accidents, or for those who are physically handicapped.The physical therapist selects specific rehabilitative treatments based on the patient’s individual medical condition. Heat may be applied to ease stiffening and joint pain. The heat source may be a hot bath, compresses, heat-creating lamps, or ultrasound waves which generate heat in tissues that are too deep to be reached by external heat applications. Massage is a standard physiotherapeutic technique, both for easing pain and for improving circulation. Hydrotherapy is useful in rebuilding injured or wasted muscles.The most frequent type of physical therapy treatment, however, is exercise, carefully chosen to increase joint mobility or to improve muscle strength and coordination.Patients with physical handicaps may be trained to learn or relearn elementary motor functions, such as holding a spoon or turning a doorknob, or they may be taught how to use crutches, prosthetic devices, or other mechanical aids. The work of physical therapists is often closely coordinated with that of the occupational therapist, since both fields involve training patients to improve their motor abilities.INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH EFFECTIVEThe physical therapist often works in tandem with other medical professionals, to more completely evaluate a patient’s condition from a medical, behavioral, functional and ergonomic perspective. This interdisciplinary approach is an effective way to clearly define the problems which are preventing an expedient or eventual return to work. Once these issues are appropriately addressed and managed, the ultimate goal of improved quality of life for the injured person, as well as reduced Worker’s Compensation costs for the employer can be realized.For more information please visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
11/30/2012 in Medical Conditions, Treatment
Numerous “red flags” can be found associated with increased incidences of delayed recovery following a compensable injury.1. Receipt of compensation for a past injury.2. Medical visits increased prior to accident.3. Frequently canceled medical appointments.4. Reports of having “had the feeling of impending doom” prior to the accident and/or nightmares about the accident.5. High absentee rate before the injury.6. A history of doctor “shopping”.7. Reluctance to cooperate with treatment.8. Pending litigation.9. Inconsistent or non-organic physical findings.10. History of alcoholism or drug abuse.11. Evidence indicating early dependency needs were not met (history of starting work at a very young age or by being a later born child in a large family).12. Family history of disability.13. Recently divorced or other recent crisis.14. Physical disability disproportionate to injury.15. Demonstrating concerns about ability to continue working or inadequate retirement savings in older workers.If present, these factors do not necessarily indicate a claimant will suffer from delayed recovery but suggest a higher risk, and these claims should be followed more closely.For more information please visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
The ProblemThe incidence of low back and neck pain is pervasive throughout society and represents a major reason for time lost from work, costing the American economy billions of dollars per year between medical care, lost wages, and benefits. Most of these lost resources are utilized by a small minority of patients. Lost time due to occupational back injuries represents a challenge to the medical industry, and the insurance world to provide early, effective treatment. The proper approach is to provide cost effective care while improving the quality of patient care and facilitating a successful and quick return to activity by the patient.BackgroundMany patients with back problems seek early care with their primary care physician or medical generalist rather than enlisting the assistance of a spine specialist.  As a result, these patients are frequently treated symptomatically without the benefit of a defined algorithm for effective testing and treating. Studies such as MRI’s are frequently ordered when unnecessary, and patients can go weeks or months before a proper diagnosis is derived and appropriate treatment initiated.This approach is counterproductive in an industrial setting where the injured worker has a propensity for further injury and extended lost time from work, without effective care.GoalsThe goal for treatment in work related spinal injuries is to provide early intervention that identifies an accurate working diagnosis and is coupled with effective treatment modalities.  The evaluation of the patient must involve the use of established algorithms ordering tests only when necessary and avoiding wasteful testing that is not medically necessary, and does not alter the course of early treatment. Early control of pain along with effective mobilization of the patient through aggressive physical therapy provides the most effective means to quickly return patients to the work place.The ultimate goal is to return the patient to their previous level of function in society. Although it is not always possible to provide 100% resolution of the problem, it is possible to maximize one’s functional capabilities through pain control and aggressive rehabilitation. It is a well-documented fact that extended time lost from work decreases the likelihood of a successful return to the workplace.Types of Injuries and TreatmentThe overwhelming majority of injuries in the work place involve simple strains and strain type syndromes. These represent simple soft tissue related injuries that are time limited in scope and do not represent long term injuries. They are easily and effectively treated with proper early intervention. This includes interruption of the pain cycle while encouraging progressive activity levels to effectively and quickly return patients to the work place. This approach typically involves the prudent use of anti-inflammatory medication in conjunction with aggressive back reconditioning, streaming function, and strengthening.All too frequently, patients are placed on extended courses of passive modalities, which leads to extended time lost from work with further rehabilitation of the patient. Some patients develop disc related injuries, most typically a herniated disc. Most disc herniations can be treated nonoperatively and frequently improve in a period of 46 weeks. Treatment modalities again include the prudent use of medication, effective rehabilitation, and injection therapy for the control of pain. The only indication for emergent surgery involves progressive neurologic deficits.  In a select group of patients, comprehensive nonoperative treatment fails requiring surgical intervention.The advent of microsurgical procedures of the spine represents a major advance for the treatment of herniated discs. This is typically undertaken as an outpatient procedure with early mobilization of the patient, facilitating early active rehabilitation. Patients typically are successfully returned to work in a limited capacity soon after surgery with improved long term results. The combination of outpatient surgery coupled with early aggressive rehabilitation results in significant cost savings to the carrier.Failed Back SurgerySurgery should only be undertaken when there is effective correlation between a patient’s complaints, physical examination, and imaging studies. The absence of complete correlation of all factors significantly decreases the likelihood of a successful surgical outcome. Failed back surgery represents a major proportion of expense in the treatment of work related injuries.  The greatest likelihood of success is with the initial procedure. Revision spine surgery holds a more guarded prognosis and should only be undertaken by those who are highly trained in this more demanding procedure.RehabilitationEarly mobilization of the patient in conjunction with control of pain represents the cornerstone of treatment. The initial step is to obtain a pain free range of motion followed by back strengthening and reconditioning. The goal is to ultimately return the patient to prior functional levels and minimize the likelihood of recurrent injuries.ConclusionThe effective treatment of back related injuries involves the coordination of care by a spinal specialist trained in the effective diagnosis and treatment of spine related injuries. Early intervention resulting in an accurate working diagnosis, coupled with well-trained academic decision making, is the most effective way to return patients to their pre-injury level of function.Coordination of care with the case manager, clinical specialist, and employer is mandatory for a successful outcome. If things are not working within the timeframe originally projected, or there are other unresolved issues pushing end of healing out further than expected, an IME may be indicated. For more information please visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
The meniscus is a half-moon shaped piece of cartilage that lies between the weight bearing joint surfaces of the femur and the tibia. It is triangular in cross section and is attached to the lining of the knee joint along its periphery. There are two menisci in a normal knee; the outside one is called the lateral meniscus, the inner one the medial meniscus.   The menisci play an important role in absorbing about a third of the impact load that the joint cartilage surface sees. It's been shown that complete removal of a meniscus can result in progressive arthritis in the joint within a decade or so in a younger patient, and sooner in patients who are older with preexisting "wear-and-tear" osteoarthritis. The menisci also cup the joint surfaces of the femur and therefore provide some degree of stabilization to the knee.The two different mechanisms for tearing a meniscus are traumatic and degenerative.Traumatic tears result from a sudden load being applied to the meniscal tissue which is severe enough to cause the meniscal cartilage to fail and let go. These usually occur from a twisting injury or a blow to the side of the knee that causes the meniscus to be levered against and compressed. A football clipping injury or a fall backwards onto the heel with rotation of the lower leg are common examples of this injury pattern. In a person under 30 years of age this typically requires a fairly violent injury although any age group can sustain a traumatic tear.Degenerative meniscal tears are best thought of as a failure of the meniscus over time. There is a natural drying-out of the inner center of the meniscus that can begin in the late 20's and progresses with age. The meniscus becomes less elastic and compliant and as a result may fail with only minimal trauma (such as just getting down into a squat). Sometimes there are no memorable injuries or violent events which can be blamed as the cause of the tear. The association of these tears with aging makes degenerative tears almost unheard of in a teenager. A torn meniscus will usually cause pain on the side of the knee that is localized to the meniscus (at the level of the joint line between the femur and tibia). Swelling of the joint may occur although meniscal tears by themselves usually don't cause a large, tensely swollen knee. Typically low-level swelling sets in the next day after the injury and is associated with stiffness and limping.Sometimes the knee becomes "locked" in a bent position and is quite painful with attempts to straighten it. This scenario is often caused by the mechanical blockage of the joint from a displaced bucket handle type meniscal tear. The torn fragment actually acts like a wedge to prevent the joint surfaces from moving, hence the knee appears locked.Any twisting, squatting or impacting activities will pinch the meniscus tear or flap and cause pain. Often the pain may improve with rest after the initial injury so that the limping resolves but as soon as aggressive activity is attempted the pain recurs. Meniscal tissue doesn't heal (with the exception noted above) due to its lack of a blood supply so symptoms are persistent until the tear is treated.The diagnosis of a tear is made based on the history and joint line findings. A physician can often stress and manipulate the knee joint in a way that provokes the meniscal tear to snap or cause pain which makes the diagnosis likely. Other times an MRI scan will be obtained to visualize the meniscus and assess its integrity. A good MRI scanner has a very high accuracy rate in determining if a tear is present.Once a meniscal tear has been diagnosed it should be treated. This doesn't have to be done urgently although patients with a painful locked knee may want surgery as soon as scheduling permits. Arthroscopic surgery is the only way to treat the tear since there are currently no medications, braces, or physical therapy treatments that have been shown to promote healing in the avascular tears.Following surgical repair, weight bearing is not permitted for about 3 weeks.  Once weight bearing has begun the knee is gradually and progressively conditioned with a supervised physical therapy program. Maximal weight training is not allowed for 2-3 months. Return to running and agility sports is permitted after 3-4 months if strength and motion have returned and pain in the joint is no longer present.Recovery from removal of a meniscal tear is much quicker and requires the use of crutches for longer walks only until the patient can walk without limping (typically 5-7 days). With a proper rehabilitation program one can usually expect to be back in sports within 4-6 weeks after the meniscectomy.visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com to learn more
10/12/2012 in Treatment, Medical Conditions
Spinal degeneration is a normal part of the aging process. Research shows that 90% of males over the age of 50, and 90% of females over age 60 have radiographic evidence of degeneration. This degeneration progresses with age and occurs in all of the structures comprising the spinal unit, including intervertebral disks, facet joints, and the connectingligaments. Other factors can influence the rate of spinal degeneration. Among those are environmental factors (such as cigarette smoking or disk injury), and physiologic factors (genetics). Areas of degeneration are likely to be dispersed across the spine and generally correspond to the mechanical stresses produced by spinal motion and posture. Research indicates that the process of spinal degeneration can be hastened by performing tasks involving heavy labor. On the other side of the spectrum, lack of activity can also hasten the degenerative process. Statistically, there is an increased frequency of spinal pain and disk herniation in heavy laborers. It appears that regular moderate exercise is important to slowing down degenerative affects. DEGENERATIVE EFFECTS ON BACKINJURIESSpinal degeneration can contribute to the severity or slow down the healing process of a back injury. Likewise, a back injury can also hasten the degenerative process. Fortunately, the advancement of diagnostic technology has greatly enhanced the ability to determine the length of presence and severity of spinal degeneration. This makes it easier for doctors to determine how the symptomatology and healing process of the injury is affected by the degenerative process. DETERMINING PERMANENCYIn cases where the claimant has sustained permanency for an injury with diagnostically documented degenerative changes, it is important that the doctor assessing permanency delineates between any preexisting degeneration which may be present and the claimed work injury. This becomes more complicated in cases where claimants are performing heavy labor. Degeneration could be prematurely caused or accelerated beyond its normal progression depending upon the length of time the heavy labor was performed. Often, this is dependent upon the type of work performed and the length of time it was performed. The medical professional also needs to consider the role environmental factors, physiological factors, and the claimant's age play in the degenerative process.THE IMEWhen obtaining IME's for back injury claims, it is important to address any preexisting conditions and/or occupational exposure in your cover letter to the evaluating doctor. Point out any preexisting degeneration you may be aware of, let the doctor know if the claimant has a history of performing heavy labor (make sure you let the doctor know if it was for your employer, or a previous or subsequent employer). Also let the doctor know of any environmental or physiological factors you are aware of. These important dynamics will assist the IME doctor in the determination of causation as well as permanency issues.Providing medical documentation is imperative. If you have any records which discuss preexisting degeneration or previous back injuries, those need to be specifically highlighted for the IME doctor in the cover letter. It would be extremely beneficial if those records could be obtained an provided for the IME. Typically, these types of cases are scheduled with orthopedic surgeons; however, neurosurgeons are qualified to conduct IME's for back injuries as well. For most cases, it would be suggested to schedule with an orthopedic surgeon unless it is an injury to the cervical spine. For more information about the reasoning behind this go to www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com or call 1.800.261.3278.]]>
10/12/2012 in Medical Conditions, Treatment
How many of us have either heard of or suffer from Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)? The numbers are probably low on both counts. People suffering from RLS may experience an urge to move their legs followed by an uncomfortable feeling such as a creeping or crawling feeling or even tingling, cramping, burning or flat-out pain. And for those of you wanting a good night sleep, that might be a problem, because RLS often takes place late in the day or at night. Let's look more closely at the seldom heard of ailment, Restless Legs Syndrome. What is Restless LegSyndrome?RLS is a neurological disorder that is characterized by unusual sensations in the thighs and calves. The sensations may feel like insects crawling on the skin, burning or tugging. The abnormal sensation may be bothersome, irritating and even painful. The best way to alleviate these sensations is to move the legs in a rapid and repetitive fashion.Activity seems to lessen the symptoms and many times, the symptoms are worse at night. How common is RLS?About eight percent of all Americans suffer from RLS, which equates to about 12 million people. This figure may be low, as this is a fairly common condition that may go undiagnosed and unreported. It is interesting to note that there is a hereditary factor associated with RLS and that 50 percent of all cases have a genetic association among family members. What causes RLS?There continues to be research into the causes of RLS and several answers are speculative.There are no known specific causes. As previously noted, there is a hereditary predisposition. It has been shown that patients with RLS may suffer from anemia and low levels of iron. There may be some underlying medical conditions that contribute to the symptoms such as kidney disease, diabetes, Parkinson's disease and peripheral neuropathy (numbness). During pregnancy, women may experience the symptoms during their last trimester. Lastly, certain cold medications, anti-seizure medications, psychiatric medications, some blood pressure medications and anti-nausea medicines may also worsen the condition. How is this diagnosed?At present, there is no specific diagnostic test that will confirm RLS. A patient must have a comprehensive history taken and a physical examination by a health care provider. There are no blood tests that will aid the diagnosis. After all underlying medical conditions have been ruled out; four basic criteria must be met. These criteria include: 1) desire to move limbs when there is an associated unusual sensation 2) symptoms that are worse at rest and improved with activity 3) motor restlessness 4) symptoms that are worse at night when trying to sleep. The International RLS Study Group has developed these criteria important to develop a regular pattern for sleep, avoid exercise just prior to bedtime, avoid the use of alcohol, and be sure to allow for relaxation at bedtime, avoiding complicated mental tasks.For more information visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com or email LeighAnn@MedicalSystemsUSA.com]]>
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injuryThank you for allowing us to share this educational series with you. As we've seen, cost of service, years of experience and training are not always good indicators of a successful case manager.People-skills are really the key to cost-effective and successful case management. Look for the following skills and abilities in your next case manager:
  • The ability to evaluate and coordinate
  • Follow-up and follow-through
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Good interpersonal and intra personal communication
  • An outstanding talent for negotiating and motivating
Sometimes, something as simple as feeling an instant rapport with the case manager can be an excellent sign that they will be successful.We hope you enjoyed this series. Look for a new series coming your way soon!For more information visit our website at www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com or call 1.800.261.3278
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injury.Last week's issue spoke of communication being directly tied to the success of the case manager. This week we will learn more about why the success of case management largely depends on the case manager's communication abilities.Doctor(s): Case managers should attend as many doctor appointments as possible so that progress in relationship to the established care plan can be discussed. Afterwards, written correspondence to the doctor recapping the conversation assures communication is clear and care stays are on track.Claimant - When the claim is initially referred to the case manager, it is highly recommended that initial contact consist of checking on the claimant to see how they are feeling and when they anticipate returning to work. The plan of care should be discussed with the employee because getting them to buy into it will go far toward gaining cooperation and compliance. In general, including the injured worker in the process will serve to promote healing and the desire to get life back to normal.Claims Manager - Finally, the claims handler is the captain of the ship and as such should always remain in control with the direction of the claim. In order to effectively direct the claim, the claims handler must be kept fully informed of case progression. Choose your tool of communication (i.e., email, phone, and fax) and make sure the case manager is aware of your preferences.If the case manager has good communication skills, the claimant will stay on the path to recovery, return to work quickly and the claim will be closed at a faster rate.Next week's edition will provide some closing tips for getting the most of your case management dollars.For more information please visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injury.Last week's issue talked about the concept of developing a plan for closing claims. This week we will discuss the importance of well-coordinated care.A good plan of care involves the creation of a "team" consisting of health care professionals, case manager, claimant, and claims handler (the boss). The case manager coordinates medical resources and makes sure excellent communication is maintained between all parties.The goal is to assure the agreed upon care plan is adhered to and modified only when necessary. The case manager must remain the center of communication for all care givers, claimant, and claims handler so if treatment gets side-tracked it can be quickly put back on course. This is how claims remain on the proper course toward closure and no dollars are unnecessarily spent.Much of what happens in this phase will be dependent upon the case manager's communication skills, and their ability to develop and maintain a positive working relationship with the treating physician and claimant. The success of your case manager can easily be judged by the rapport you have developed with them and if understanding them is effortless.Next week's edition will further underscore the importance of good communication to the success of the case manager.For more information please visit our website at www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injuryOnce the medical case manager has properly evaluated the medical condition and determined the assigned diagnosis is correct, they are ready to assess whether the claimant is seeing the appropriate type of doctor(s), and develop a plan of care.The plan of care should be designed around the claimant's current status and the response they had to previously provided care (if any). It should be an aggressive (not abrasive) plan with the goal of reaching a finite end of healing date within a reasonable amount of time.The case manager should communicate the plan of care to you before presenting it to anyone else. You should expect to receive a written step by step plan with a verbal explanation of each step in the process. Before any plan is implemented, it should have your "stamp of approval."How do you go about knowing the plan is a good one? One way is to assure it includes a well-coordinated use of all medical resources available. Look for next week’s edition on coordinating medical resources. Next week, we will learn the importance of staying on course.For more information visit our website at www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injuryLast week, we talked about medical case management as a collaborative process. This issue will talk about how a case manager begins by familiarizing themselves with the case. The methods most widely used include:
  • Discussion with the claims manager about the course of      the claim
  • Review of medical documentation
  • Chatting with the claimant (if possible)
  • Conversation with health care providers
After the review process is complete, the case manager is ready to evaluate medical aspects of the claim (such as the appropriateness of treatment, relationship of care to work injury, and return to work issues). Following that, cost issues such as what it will take to close the claim and/or return the injured worker to work as quickly as possible need to be considered.After these assessments have been made, the case manager is ready to develop and implement a custom-designed plan of care that takes all issues of the claim into consideration and works toward closing the claim. Next week, we will learn the importance of staying on course.For more information visit our website at www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injuryLast week, we discussed the elements of good case management. This week we will talk about medical case management as a collaborative process, involving all health care providers, the injured worker, and the claims manager. The purpose of using a medical case manager is to facilitate the treatment plan in order to expeditiously bring the injured worker to an end of healing in the most cost-effective manner possible.As such, the medical case manager's role is to assess the care-plan for:
  • Appropriateness in relationship to the claimed injury,
  • Cost-effectiveness,
  • Methods to return the claimant to work, and
  • Bring the worker to an end of healing as quickly as possible.
In order to accomplish these goals, the case manager must have excellent medical assessment abilities, great communication skills and be a good motivator. Next week, we will discuss tips for assuring adequate evaluation of a medical condition.For more information visit our website at www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injuryMedical case management, if used properly, can be an effective tool to keep claims costs down. Good medical case management contains the following elements:
  1. Thorough evaluation of the medical condition
  2. Development and implementation of a plan of care
  3. Coordination of all available medical resources
  4. Making sure all health care professionals are in communication and working toward one common goal
  5. Monitoring and evaluating progress
As the person picking up the tab for case management, your responsibility is to assure that each of these 5 steps are being performed in a progressive manner that is satisfactory to you. Next week, we will explore the role of the medical case manager in the process.For more information visit www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
An informative weekly series for the benefit of those managing claims of injurySERIES INTRODUCTION: This is the first of a weekly educational series offering insight into case management. You will get valuable tips from this blog on selecting a good case manager so you can get the most from your case management dollars. Here are topics this blog series will address:
  • Elements of good case management
  • Collaborative process facilitates quick claim closure
  • A well-informed case manager is a good case manager
  • Aggressive return to work
  • Well-coordinated care
  • Communication is the key to success
Next week we will define the elements of good case management. Stay tuned!For more information on Medical Systems go to www.MedicalSystemsUSA.com
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